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East Haven Estate Lawyer, Connecticut


Andrew M Amendola Lawyer

Andrew M Amendola

VERIFIED
Estate, Accident & Injury, Motor Vehicle, Criminal, Real Estate

Mr. Amendola is an Estate lawyer serving the East Haven, Connecticut and the surrounding area.

Herbert Ira Mendelsohn Lawyer

Herbert Ira Mendelsohn

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Workers' Compensation, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
It's Not Just Business, It's Personal.

Herbert Mendelsohn is a personal injury lawyer proudly serving clients in New Haven, Connecticut and the neighboring communities.

Mario J. Zangari

Wills & Probate, Corporate, Estate Planning, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert W. Lynch

Wills & Probate, Corporate, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Peter D. Hershman

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Tax
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert F. Cohn

Business Organization, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert T. Gradoville

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Planning, Pension & Benefits
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy W. Crowley

Estate Administration, Estate Planning, Family Law, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gregory J. Gallo

Family Law, Corporate, Estate Planning, Land Use & Zoning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael D Saffer

Business Organization, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find East Haven Estate Lawyers and East Haven Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

TRUSTEE

The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income ... (more...)
The person who manages assets owned by a trust under the terms of the trust document. A trustee's purpose is to safeguard the trust and distribute trust income or principal as directed in the trust document. With a simple probate-avoidance living trust, the person who creates the trust is also the trustee.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

DISCHARGE (OF PROBATE ADMINISTRATOR)

A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties hav... (more...)
A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties have been completed but may happen sooner if the executor or administrator wishes to withdraw or is dismissed.

DISTRIBUTEE

(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (ca... (more...)
(1) Anyone who receives something. Usually, the term refers to someone who inherits a deceased person's property. If the deceased person dies without a will (called intestate), state law determines what each distributee will receive. Also called a beneficiary.

EXEMPTION TRUST

A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth m... (more...)
A bypass trust funded with an amount no larger than the personal federal estate tax exemption in the year of death. If the trust grantor leaves property worth more than that amount, it usually goes to the surviving spouse. The trust property passes free from estate tax because of the personal exemption, and the rest is shielded from tax under the surviving spouse's marital deduction.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

WE 470 MURDOCK, LLC v. Cosmos Real Estate, LLC

958 A.2d 1248 (2008). 289 Conn. 938. WE 470 MURDOCK, LLC v. COSMOS REAL ESTATE, LLC, et al. Supreme Court of Connecticut. Decided October 3, 2008. Sabato P. Fiano, in support of the petition. Melvin A. Simon, Hartford, in opposition. ...

WE 470 MURDOCK, LLC v. Cosmos Real Estate

The following facts and procedural history are relevant to our resolution of the plaintiff's appeal. The defendant is a limited liability corporation formed by Dina Begetis, Pagioti Begetis and Efrosene Begetis, all of whom are daughters of Asimina Begetis. On March 1, 2004, ...

Caltabiano v. L AND L REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS

The following facts and procedural history are relevant to the resolution of the plaintiffs' appeal. Cumberland Farms, 1260 Inc., is the owner of commercial property located at 1211-1223 Boston Post Road, within the commercial town center district of Westbrook. The Dohnna, ...