Elgin Bankruptcy & Debt Lawyer, Illinois

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Colleen  Thomas Lawyer

Colleen Thomas

Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, Child Custody, Child Support, Adoption

Thomas Law Office is a family law practice that handles divorce and bankruptcy cases, as well as child custody, child support, adoptions and more. For... (more)

Tracey A. Hower Lawyer

Tracey A. Hower

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Immigration, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal
EXPERIENCED LEGAL COUNSEL YOU CAN TRUST | Kane, DuPage, Kendall, & DeKalb Counties |

Consistently achieving positive results for her clients does not happen by accident. Attorney Tracey A. Hower is a certified Guardian Ad Litem and Med... (more)

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800-851-2840

Joshua D. Lloyd Lawyer

Joshua D. Lloyd

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
EXPERIENCED LEGAL COUNSEL YOU CAN TRUST

Joshua Lloyd is an associate attorney at Hower Law Firm LLC and his current area of focus is family law. Mr. Lloyd received his J.D. from the Northern... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

630-797-5505

John E. Juergensmeyer

Corporate, Consumer Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Thomas Gosselin

Business Organization, Collection, Commercial Real Estate, Defamation & Slander
Status:  In Good Standing           

Scott W Sheen

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Kurt Hurtgen

Farms, Family Law, Divorce, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Sarah J. Holbrook

Bankruptcy, Foreclosure
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael C Deutsch

Contract, Business Successions, Business Organization, Dissolution
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  39 Years

John Frederick Hurlbut

Arbitration, Criminal, Administrative Law, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

FAIR CREDIT REPORTING ACT (FCRA)

A federal law that is designed to prevent inaccurate or obsolete information from entering or remaining in a credit report. The law requires credit bureaus to a... (more...)
A federal law that is designed to prevent inaccurate or obsolete information from entering or remaining in a credit report. The law requires credit bureaus to adopt reasonable procedures for gathering, maintaining and disseminating information and bars credit bureaus from reporting negative information that is older than seven years, except a bankruptcy, which may be reported for ten. If you notify a credit bureau of an error in your credit report, the FCRA requires the bureau to investigate your allegations within 30 days, review all information you provide, remove inaccurate and unverified information and adopt procedures to keep the information from reappearing. In addition, the law requires that creditors refrain from reporting incorrect information to credit bureaus.

NUISANCE FEES

Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fe... (more...)
Money charged by some credit card companies to increase their profits when you fail to use the card the way the creditor wants. Examples include late payment fees, inactivity fees and fees for not carrying a balance from month to month. It's best to shop around and get rid of cards that have these fees attached.

GRACE PERIOD

A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you h... (more...)
A period of time during which you are not required to make payments on a debt. For example, most credit cards give you a grace period of 20-30 days before you have to pay interest on the amount of your purchases. Cash advances, however, usually have no grace period; interest begins to accumulate from the date of the withdrawal, even if you pay your bills on time. Also, some student loans give you a grace period after graduating or dropping out of school. During this time, you are not required to make payments on your loan.

SUBROGATION

A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off i... (more...)
A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off its injured claimant takes the legal rights the claimant has against a third party that caused the injury, and sues that third party.

FCRA

See Fair Credit Reporting Act.

S CORPORATION

A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status fro... (more...)
A term that describes a profit-making corporation organized under state law whose shareholders have applied for and received subchapter S corporation status from the Internal Revenue Service. Electing to do business as an S corporation lets shareholders enjoy limited liability status, as would be true of any corporation, but be taxed like a partnership or sole proprietor. That is, instead of being taxed as a separate entity (as would be the case with a regular or C corporation) an S corporation is a pass-through tax entity: income taxes are reported and paid by the shareholders, not the S corporation. To qualify as an S corporation a number of IRS rules must be met, such as a limit of 75 shareholders and citizenship requirements.

PREFERENCE

A payment made by a debtor to a creditor within a defined period prior to filing for bankruptcy -- within three months for arms-length creditors (regular commer... (more...)
A payment made by a debtor to a creditor within a defined period prior to filing for bankruptcy -- within three months for arms-length creditors (regular commercial creditors) and within one year for insider creditors (friends, family members, and business associates). Because a preference gives the creditor who received the payment an edge over other creditors in the bankruptcy case, the trustee can recover the preference (the amount of the payment) and distribute it among all of the creditors.

FAIR CREDIT BILLING ACT (FCBA)

A federal law that gives you rights when an error occurs on your credit card statement. You must notify the credit card company of the mistake within 60 days af... (more...)
A federal law that gives you rights when an error occurs on your credit card statement. You must notify the credit card company of the mistake within 60 days after it mailed the bill to you. The company must then correct the mistake, or at least acknowledge receipt of your letter within 30 days, and must correct the error within 90 days or explain why it believes the credit card statement is correct.

DEFINED CONTRIBUTION PLAN

A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount ... (more...)
A type of pension plan that does not guarantee any particular pension amount upon retirement. Instead, the employer pays into the pension fund a certain amount every month, or every year, for each employee. The employer usually pays a fixed percentage of an employee's wages or salary, although sometimes the amount is a fraction of the company's profits, with the size of each employee's pension share depending on the amount of wage or salary. Upon retirement, each employee's pension is determined by how much was contributed to the fund on behalf of that employee over the years, plus whatever earnings that money has accumulated as part of the investments of the entire pension fund.