Fort Smith Criminal Lawyer, Arkansas


Carl Warner Hopkins

Immigration, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gary L. King

Other, Immigration, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael Medlock

Personal Injury, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew Alex Flake

Social Security, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Rex Wallace Chronister

Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anthony Pirani

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Ron Fields

Medical Malpractice, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Christy Lanette Aaro Allen

Social Security, Criminal, Disability, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

J. Randolph Shock

Divorce, Criminal, Corporate, Toxic Mold & Tort
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mosemarie "Mosie" Dora Boyd

Personal Injury, Family Law, Criminal, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

BATTERY

A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how... (more...)
A crime consisting of physical contact that is intended to harm someone. Unintentional harmful contact is not battery, no mater how careless the behavior or how severe the injury. A fist fight is a common battery; being hit by a wild pitch in a baseball game is not.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Hill v. Norris

... Appellant subsequently filed in this court a petition to proceed pursuant to Criminal Procedure Rule 37.1 (2010) that was denied. ... Id. A court with personal and subject-matter jurisdiction over the defendant in a criminal proceeding has authority to render judgment. ...

Moore v. Hobbs

... On March 12, 2010, appellant Timothy Ramon Moore, who is incarcerated in the custody of the Arkansas Department of Correction by virtue of multiple criminal convictions, filed in the circuit court in the county where he was incarcerated a pro se petition for writ of habeas ...

State v. Rowe

... As a threshold issue, we must determine the propriety of this appeal under Rule 3 of the Arkansas Rules of Appellate Procedure—Criminal. A significant difference exists between appeals brought by criminal defendants and those brought on behalf of the State. ...