Green Bay Estate Lawyer, Wisconsin


Alf  Langan Lawyer

Alf Langan

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Criminal, Federal, Tax Litigation
Licensed in Wisconsin, Illinois, Federal Eastern District of Wisconsin, and U.S. Tax Court

Mr. Langan is a Criminal Lawyer serving Green Bay, Wisconsin and the surrounding areas. He has been practicing law for over 20 years.

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-382-0901

Kevin  Lonergan Lawyer

Kevin Lonergan

Accident & Injury, Family Law, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Business

Kevin has a reputation for handling complex litigation matters for clients with catastrophic injuries and for clients who have lost loved ones. Althou... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

920-739-7366

Philip R. Brehm

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

Timothy Polack

Corporate, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Michael R. McCanna

Arbitration, Corporate, Environmental Law, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Don R. Herrling

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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CONTACT

Roger W. Clark

Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Gregory John Babcock

Bankruptcy & Debt, Business, Employment, Estate, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Thomas J. Parins

Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Employment, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Curtis Czachor

Bankruptcy, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Green Bay Estate Lawyers and Green Bay Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

FUNDING A TRUST

Transferring ownership of property to a trust.

IN TERROREM

Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement... (more...)
Latin meaning 'in fear.' This phrase is used to describe provisions in contracts or wills meant to scare a person into complying with the terms of the agreement. For example, a will might state that an heir will forfeit her inheritance if she challenges the validity of the will. Of course, if the will is challenged and found to be invalid, then the clause itself is also invalid and the heir takes whatever she would have inherited if there were no will.

UNIFORM TRANSFER-ON-DEATH SECURITY ACT

A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using... (more...)
A statute that allows people to name a beneficiary to inherit stocks or bonds without probate. The owner of the securities can register them with a broker using a simple form that names a person to receive the property after the owner's death. Every state but Texas has adopted the statute.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

PETITION

A formal written request made to a court, asking for an order or ruling on a particular matter. For example, if you want to be appointed conservator for an elde... (more...)
A formal written request made to a court, asking for an order or ruling on a particular matter. For example, if you want to be appointed conservator for an elderly relative, you must file a petition with a court. See also complaint.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.