Haddonfield Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, New Jersey

Sponsored Law Firm


Kelli  Martone Lawyer

Kelli Martone

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Domestic Violence & Neglect

I have been practicing exclusively in the area of matrimonial law since my admission to the bar in 2005 and has significant experience handling all ty... (more)

Mark S Guralnick Lawyer

Mark S Guralnick

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Legal Malpractice
Full Range of Services

Our team is led by national trial lawyer Mark S. Guralnick, who has credentials like no other lawyer. With 8 college degrees, multiple specialty certi... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-399-8371

Ronald A Graziano Lawyer

Ronald A Graziano

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Custody & Visitation, Alimony & Spousal Support, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Experienced. Tough. Understanding

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. The case that was the most si... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-928-8750

Ronald G. Lieberman Lawyer

Ronald G. Lieberman

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Litigation

A Partner and Chair of the Family Law Practice, Ronald Lieberman is a highly experienced attorney who understands the intricacies of matrimonial and f... (more)

Speak with Lawyer.com
Bari Z. Weinberger Lawyer

Bari Z. Weinberger

VERIFIED
Divorce, Child Custody, Family Law, Child Support, Adoption
Trusted Authority on New Jersey Divorce & Family Law.

Bari Zell Weinberger was awarded a Juris Doctorate in 1997 from Suffolk University Law School, and has dedicated her practice exclusively to the field... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

856-438-0128

D. Ryan Nussey

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert J. Adinolfi

Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eric S. Spevak

Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Melissa L. Mignogna

Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jamie Elizabeth Galemba

Family Law, Collaborative Law, Divorce, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Haddonfield Divorce & Family Law Lawyers and Haddonfield Divorce & Family Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Divorce & Family Law practice areas such as Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law matters.

LEGAL TERMS

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

MARTIAL MISCONDUCT

See fault divorce.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

CONFINEMENT IN PRISON

In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of ... (more...)
In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of years.

SPOUSAL SUPPORT

See alimony.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.