Helmville Wills & Probate Lawyer, Montana


Includes: Estate Administration, Living Wills, Wills

Charles R Johnson

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Roxie Bianca Lovett

Employee Rights, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  9 Years

J. Allen Bradshaw

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  55 Years

Blaine Cooper Bradshaw

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years
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Peter Smilde

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  44 Years

Patrick Jeffrey Moody

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  5 Years

Ted L. Mizner

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  46 Years

Lewis Kelsey Smith

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Daniel James Miller

Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Donald J. Beighle

General Practice
Status:  Suspended           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

ACCUMULATION TRUST

A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nic... (more...)
A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nick's benefit but stipulates that Nick will not get a penny until he gets a Ph.D. in French; Nick is the beneficiary of an accumulation trust.

SURVIVING SPOUSE'S TRUST

If a couple has created an AB trust, the revocable living trust (Trust B) of the surviving spouse, after the first spouse has died.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

INHERITANCE TAXES

Taxes some states impose on people or organizations who inherit property from a deceased person's estate. The taxes are based on the value of the inherited prop... (more...)
Taxes some states impose on people or organizations who inherit property from a deceased person's estate. The taxes are based on the value of the inherited property.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Marchwick

... 5 Marchwick filed an application of informal probate of will and appointment of personal representative on April 27, 2007. ... Marchwick filed a petition for a formal order acknowledging revocation of probate and non-probate transfers by divorce on June 13, 2008. ...

In re Estate of Lightfield

... She was survived by her two children, Lee Lightfield and Linda Carlsen. Each child desired probate of a different will signed by Aileen. ... Linda does not appeal. ¶ 2 We restate the issues as follows: ¶ 3 1. Did the District Court err in denying probate of a holographic will? ...

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF GLENNIE

... The order dismissed Bruce's objection to admit Thomas Glennie's (Thomas) September 2009 will to probate, and to set aside the Cattle Sale and Options Agreement and Lease-Cattle Agreement (collectively "Agreements"). ... Bruce filed an objection to probate Thomas's will. ...