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Jackson Child Support Lawyer, Mississippi


M. Devin Whitt

Adoption, Child Support, Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Lindsey Ann Hill

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Criminal, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brendan C. Sartin

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collection, Construction Liens
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jonathan T. Day

Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Robert Marvin Peebles

Real Estate, Personal Injury, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  10 Years

Demetrice L Williams

Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

GUARDIAN AD LITEM

A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. Fo... (more...)
A person, not necessarily a lawyer, who is appointed by a court to represent and protect the interests of a child or an incapacitated adult during a lawsuit. For example, a guardian ad litem (GAL) may be appointed to represent the interests of a child whose parents are locked in a contentious battle for custody, or to protect a child's interests in a lawsuit where there are allegations of child abuse. The GAL may conduct interviews and investigations, make reports to the court and participate in court hearings or mediation sessions. Sometimes called court-appointed special advocates (CASAs).

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Evans v. Evans

... Evans filed a counter-complaint to a claim filed by his former wife, Beverly Evans (Beverly), in which she requested an increase in the monthly child-support obligation, payment of all college expenses for their daughter Elizabeth, payment of back child support, and attorneys ...

Keith v. Purvis

... 1. Jackie Keith (Keith) appeals the March 2, 2007, order of the Forrest County Chancery Court, denying him reimbursement for child support payments made during a twenty-two ... By the same judgment, Keith was ordered to pay child support in the amount of $350 per month. ...

Powell v. Powell

... 1. Richard H. Powell appeals from an order of the Chancery Court of Harrison County, which denied his motion for modification of child custody and petition for contempt and granted Amy Sue Powell's motion for an upward modification of child support. ...