Madison DUI-DWI Lawyer, Wisconsin


Richard B. Jacobson Lawyer

Richard B. Jacobson

VERIFIED
Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Family Law

I have worked in large and small firms in large and small cities. I learned to strive to work with clients to ease their stress and find options whic... (more)

Marinus (Rick) J.W. Petri

Administrative Law, Dispute Resolution, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

William Ginsberg

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Litigation, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Steven W. Zaleski

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Charles K Kenyon

Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tracey Ann Wood

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

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J. Steven House

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

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Christopher Van Wagner

DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Steven House

DUI-DWI, State Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert D. Zitowsky

Family Law, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

AGGRAVATING CIRCUMSTANCES

Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, th... (more...)
Circumstances that increase the seriousness or outrageousness of a given crime, and that in turn increase the wrongdoer's penalty or punishment. For example, the crime of aggravated assault is a physical attack made worse because it is committed with a dangerous weapon, results in severe bodily injury or is made in conjunction with another serious crime. Aggravated assault is usually considered a felony, punishable by a prison sentence.

CRIMINAL LAW

Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not p... (more...)
Laws written by Congress and state legislators that make certain behavior illegal and punishable by fines and/or imprisonment. By contrast, civil laws are not punishable by imprisonment. In order to be found guilty of a criminal law, the prosecution must show that the defendant intended to act as he did; in civil law, you may sometimes be responsible for your actions even though you did not intend the consequences. For example, civil law makes you financially responsible for a car accident you caused but didn't intend.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

CORPUS DELECTI

Latin for the 'body of the crime.' Used to describe physical evidence, such as the corpse of a murder victim or the charred frame of a torched building.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

INDECENT EXPOSURE

Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that ... (more...)
Revealing one's genitals under circumstances likely to offend others. Exposure is indecent under the law whenever a reasonable person would or should know that his act may be seen by others--for example, in a public place or through an open window--and that it is likely to cause affront or alarm. Indecent exposure is considered a misdemeanor in most states.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Carter

... Id. at 100. In rejecting the plaintiff's challenge, the court clarified that a summary suspension under the "zero tolerance" law is not a summary suspension under DUI law, and therefore "[p]laintiff's reliance on DUI law is puzzling because plaintiff was not arrested for DUI." Id. ...

State v. Carter

... Id. at 100. In rejecting the plaintiff's challenge, the court clarified that a summary suspension under the "zero tolerance" law is not a summary suspension under DUI law, and therefore "[p]laintiff's reliance on DUI law is puzzling because plaintiff was not arrested for DUI." Id. ...

State v. MALSBURY

... The State counters that because Malsbury's Washington conviction was originally charged as driving under the influence (DUI) and later amended to reckless driving with OWI-like penalties, the conviction counts for purposes of Wisconsin's OWI laws. ...