Madison DUI-DWI Lawyer, Wisconsin


Richard B. Jacobson Lawyer

Richard B. Jacobson

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Criminal, Bankruptcy & Debt, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Family Law

I have worked in large and small firms in large and small cities. I learned to strive to work with clients to ease their stress and find options whic... (more)

William Ginsberg

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Litigation, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

Steven W. Zaleski

Bankruptcy, Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Tracey Ann Wood

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, White Collar Crime
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

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J. Steven House

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

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Marinus (Rick) J.W. Petri

Administrative Law, Dispute Resolution, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  40 Years

Christopher Van Wagner

DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Charles K Kenyon

Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years

Steven House

DUI-DWI, State Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Robert D. Zitowsky

Family Law, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

PRESUMPTION OF INNOCENCE

One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecu... (more...)
One of the most sacred principles in the American criminal justice system, holding that a defendant is innocent until proven guilty. In other words, the prosecution must prove, beyond a reasonable doubt, each element of the crime charged.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

MOTION IN LIMINE

A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply ... (more...)
A request submitted to the court before trial in an attempt to exclude evidence from the proceedings. A motion in limine is usually made by a party when simply the mention of the evidence would prejudice the jury against that party, even if the judge later instructed the jury to disregard the evidence. For example, if a defendant in a criminal trial were questioned and confessed to the crime without having been read his Miranda rights, his lawyer would file a motion in limine to keep evidence of the confession out of the trial.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

BAILIFF

A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to mai... (more...)
A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Carter

... Id. at 100. In rejecting the plaintiff's challenge, the court clarified that a summary suspension under the "zero tolerance" law is not a summary suspension under DUI law, and therefore "[p]laintiff's reliance on DUI law is puzzling because plaintiff was not arrested for DUI." Id. ...

State v. Carter

... Id. at 100. In rejecting the plaintiff's challenge, the court clarified that a summary suspension under the "zero tolerance" law is not a summary suspension under DUI law, and therefore "[p]laintiff's reliance on DUI law is puzzling because plaintiff was not arrested for DUI." Id. ...

State v. MALSBURY

... The State counters that because Malsbury's Washington conviction was originally charged as driving under the influence (DUI) and later amended to reckless driving with OWI-like penalties, the conviction counts for purposes of Wisconsin's OWI laws. ...