Medfield RICO Act Lawyer, Massachusetts


David  Ribak Lawyer

David Ribak

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Personal Injury, Business, Real Estate

David Ribak is a Criminal Defense Lawyer proudly serving Dedham, Massachusetts and the neighboring communities.

Samuel P. Reef Lawyer

Samuel P. Reef

VERIFIED
Conveyancing, Car Accident, Bankruptcy, Divorce, DUI-DWI

Samuel Reef is a practicing lawyer in the state of Massachusetts. He received his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School in 1994. He currently works ... (more)

Joseph P. Cataldo Lawyer

Joseph P. Cataldo

VERIFIED
Criminal, Litigation, Domestic Violence & Neglect

Joseph P. Cataldo a partner at Cataldo Law Offices, LLC heads the firm’s criminal practice, as well as certain areas of civil litigation. He is rega... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-835-6941

Frank A Yee

Employment, White Collar Crime, Criminal, Securities
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Alisha S. Tomasino

Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Stephen E. Dawley

Commercial Real Estate, Conveyancing, DUI-DWI, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Thomas G. Waldstein

Estate Planning, Criminal, Personal Injury, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Joseph C. Borsellino

Age Discrimination, Criminal, Discrimination, Employment Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

John H. LaChance

Complex Litigation, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal
Status:  In Good Standing           

David Finkelstein

Criminal, Employment, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find Medfield RICO Act Lawyers and Medfield RICO Act Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

PUBLIC DEFENDER

A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and ar... (more...)
A lawyer appointed by the court and paid by the county, state, or federal government to represent clients who are charged with violations of criminal law and are unable to pay for their own defense.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

GREEN CARD

The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of ... (more...)
The well-known term for an Alien Registration Receipt Card. This plastic photo identification card is given to individuals who are legal permanent residents of the United States. It serves as a U.S. entry document in place of a visa, enabling permanent residents to return to the United States after temporary absences. The key characteristic of a green card is that it allows the holder to live permanently in the United States. Unless you abandon your residence or violate certain criminal or immigration laws, your green card can never be taken away. Possession of a green card also allows you to work in the United States legally. Those who hold green cards for a certain length of time may eventually apply for U.S. citizenship. Green cards have an expiration date of ten years from issuance. This does not mean that your permanent resident status expires. You must simply apply for a new card.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

MISDEMEANOR

A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk d... (more...)
A crime, less serious than a felony, punishable by no more than one year in jail. Petty theft (of articles worth less than a certain amount), first-time drunk driving and leaving the scene of an accident are all common misdemeanors.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

HUNG JURY

A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations ... (more...)
A jury unable to come to a final decision, resulting in a mistrial. Judges do their best to avoid hung juries, typically sending juries back into deliberations with an assurance (sometimes known as a 'dynamite charge') that they will be able to reach a decision if they try harder. If a mistrial is declared, the case is tried again unless the parties settle the case (in a civil case) or the prosecution dismisses the charges or offers a plea bargain (in a criminal case).