Cambridge RICO Act Lawyer, Massachusetts

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Susan  Correia-Champa Lawyer

Susan Correia-Champa

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Criminal, Litigation, Divorce & Family Law
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If you're in Suffolk County, Essex County, Norfolk County, Plymouth County, or other surrounding areas, and are looking for truly helpful representati... (more)

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Joseph  Simons Lawyer

Joseph Simons

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Criminal, White Collar Crime, Felony, DUI-DWI
Offering high-quality criminal defense to people in Boston and throughout Massachusetts.

I help people in all walks of life, from doctors to CEOs to blue-collar workers. Whoever you are, if you're facing criminal charges, everything else ... (more)

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Francis T. O'Brien, Jr. Lawyer

Francis T. O'Brien, Jr.

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice, Traffic

Francis T. O’Brien, Jr. is the founder of O'Brien Law Boston, a criminal law specialty firm. Formerly of counsel/director of criminal practice grou... (more)

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Elliot M. Weinstein Lawyer

Elliot M. Weinstein

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Criminal

Elliot M. Weinstein is a criminal defense attorney who represents people accused of serious crimes in both federal and state courts. Located in Boston... (more)

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617-367-9334

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Jeff  Murad Lawyer

Jeff Murad

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Accident & Injury, Criminal

Established in Boston in 1965, Murad Law concentrates on representing clients seeking aid in Massachusetts Personal Injury Law. With over 69 years of ... (more)

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617-227-4648

Herbert Stuart Cohen Lawyer

Herbert Stuart Cohen

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Real Estate, Business, Accident & Injury, Lawsuit & Dispute, Criminal

Herbert S. Cohen is the founder and principal of the Cohen Law Group. With over 50 years of legal experience, Attorney Cohen has represented countless... (more)

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Joseph J. Goldberg-Giuliano

Colleges & Universities, Federal, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Lauren M. Burke

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Real Estate
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Steven J. Topazio

Criminal, Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Felony
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Neil S Tassel

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal
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LEGAL TERMS

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

BAIL

The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all requi... (more...)
The money paid to the court, usually at arraignment or shortly thereafter, to ensure that an arrested person who is released from jail will show up at all required court appearances. The amount of bail is determined by the local bail schedule, which is based on the seriousness of the offense. The judge can increase the bail if the prosecutor convinces him that the defendant is likely to flee (for example, if he has failed to show up in court in the past), or he can decrease it if the defense attorney shows that the defendant is unlikely to run (for example, he has strong ties to the community by way of a steady job and a family).

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

INADMISSIBLE EVIDENCE

Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main r... (more...)
Testimony or other evidence that fails to meet state or federal court rules governing the types of evidence that can be presented to a judge or jury. The main reason why evidence is ruled inadmissible is because it falls into a category deemed so unreliable that a court should not consider it as part of a deciding a case --for example, hearsay evidence, or an expert's opinion that is not based on facts generally accepted in the field. Evidence will also be declared inadmissible if it suffers from some other defect--for example, as compared to its value, it will take too long to present or risks enflaming the jury, as might be the case with graphic pictures of a homicide victim. In addition, in criminal cases, evidence that is gathered using illegal methods is commonly ruled inadmissible. Because the rules of evidence are so complicated (and because contesting lawyers waste so much time arguing over them) there is a strong trend towards using mediation or arbitration to resolve civil disputes. In mediation and arbitration, virtually all evidence can be considered. See evidence, admissible evidence.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.