New Haven County, CT Trusts Lawyers


Matthew A. McColl

Estate Administration, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

David A. Stein

International, Trusts, Gift Taxation, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

David T Austin

Dispute Resolution, Trusts, Arbitration, Complex Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Shannon Carlotta Bansley

Residential Real Estate, Trusts, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Matthew Aaron Wiley

Estate, Real Estate, Business, Trusts, Pharmaceutical Product
Status:  In Good Standing           

Richard Jay Klein

Trusts, Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years

Robert J Engelman

Private Schools, Trusts, Business & Trade, Contract
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  61 Years

Cynthia Jean Griffith

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  29 Years

Debbie K Hernandez

Trusts, International, Gift Taxation
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  21 Years

Debbie Hernandez

Tax, International Other, Trusts, Gift Taxation
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  21 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

PRETERMITTED HEIR

A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child b... (more...)
A child or spouse who is not mentioned in a will and whom the court believes was accidentally overlooked by the person who made the will. For example, a child born or adopted after the will is made may be deemed a pretermitted heir. If the court determines that an heir was accidentally omitted, that heir is entitled to receive the same share of the estate as she would have if the deceased had died without a will. A pretermitted heir is sometimes called an 'omitted heir.'

ABATEMENT

A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other exp... (more...)
A reduction. After a death, abatement occurs if the deceased person didn't leave enough property to fulfill all the bequests made in the will and meet other expenses. Gifts left in the will are cut back in order to pay taxes, satisfy debts or take care of other gifts that are given priority under law or by the will itself.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

ACCUMULATION TRUST

A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nic... (more...)
A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nick's benefit but stipulates that Nick will not get a penny until he gets a Ph.D. in French; Nick is the beneficiary of an accumulation trust.

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

GROSS ESTATE

For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of prob... (more...)
For federal estate tax filing purposes, the total of all property owned at death, without regard to any debts or liens against the property or the costs of probate. Taxes are due only on the value of the property the person actually owned (the net estate) plus the amount of any taxable gifts made during life. In a few states, the gross estate is used when computing attorney fees for probating estates; the lawyer gets a percentage of the gross estate.

BANKRUPTCY ESTATE

All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankrup... (more...)
All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankruptcy estate for the duration of your case.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

CHARITABLE TRUST

Any trust designed to make a substantial gift to a charity and also achieve income and estate tax savings for the person who creates the trust (the grantor).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Taylor v. BARBERINO

... The plaintiffs, Marsha B. Taylor, formerly known as Marsha B. Petruzelli, and the accounting firm of Draskinis & Reims, PC, trustee of the Marsha B. Petruzelli Accumulation Trust and the Marsha B. Petruzelli Spray Trust (trusts), appeal from the summary judgment rendered by ...

Barber v. Barber

... At the hearing, the plaintiff disclosed that various partnership assets, including funds related to the sale of real property, had been transferred into two trusts in which he had a financial interest. Despite being directed by Kosowsky ...

Barber v. Barber

... At the hearing, the plaintiff disclosed that various partnership assets, including funds related to the sale of real property, had been transferred into two trusts in which he had a financial interest. Despite being directed by Kosowsky ...