New York Estate Planning Lawyer, New York

Sponsored Law Firm


Includes: Gift Taxation

Charles L. Mitchell Lawyer

Charles L. Mitchell

Estate, Estate Planning, Estate Administration, Real Estate, Employment

Mr. Mitchell has been enjoying the practice of law for over 35 years, providing valued service for an array of clients. As outside counsel to North G... (more)

Jeffrey Francis Borrell Lawyer

Jeffrey Francis Borrell

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Bankruptcy, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation
BorrellandRiso LLP

We are a general practice firm and concentrate in the areas listed. We have 4 convenient locations: Staten Island,N.Y., Brooklyn N.Y., Matawan N.... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-854-5701

Lawrence M. Gordon Lawyer

Lawrence M. Gordon

VERIFIED
Alcoholic Beverages, Estate Planning, Accident & Injury, Commercial Real Estate, Residential Real Estate
Providing Solutions For Decades

Larry Gordon, an attorney practicing throughout Long Island and the five boroughs for four (4) decades is a highly acclaimed and respected legal pract... (more)

Jacob M. Dyckman

Real Estate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Andrea Lowenthal

Elder Law, Estate Planning, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Mental Health
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Dan Shaked

Estate Planning, Corporate, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Avron I. Brog

Tax, Trusts, Estate Planning, Business Organization
Status:  In Good Standing           

John F Kaley

Estate Planning, Family Law, Criminal, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Valerie A. Burg

Gift Taxation, Estate Administration, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

A. Mitchell Greene

Business Organization, Wills & Probate, Corporate, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find New York Estate Planning Lawyers and New York Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

ADMINISTRATOR

A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone t... (more...)
A person appointed by a probate court to handle the distribution of property of someone who has died without a will, or with a will that fails to name someone to carry out this task. administrator ad litem A person appointed by a probate court to represent an estate during a lawsuit. (Ad litem is Latin for 'during the litigation.') An administrator ad litem is appointed only if there is no existing executor or administrator of the estate, or if the executor or administrator has conflicting interests. For example, Jerry's will leaves most of his property to his brother, Jeff, and also names Jeff as executor of the will. But Jerry's sister, Janine, feels that Jerry made the will under improper pressure from Jeff, and brings a lawsuit to challenge it. The court appoints an administrator ad litem to represent Jerry's estate while the lawsuit is in progress. Also known as administrator ad prosequendum, meaning administrator 'during the prosecution.' administrator ad prosequendum See administrator ad litem.administrator cum testamento annexo See administrator with will annexed. administrator de bonis non (DBN) Latin for 'administrator of goods not administered.' This term refers to the person appointed by a probate court to finish probate proceedings when the executor or previous administrator can't finish the job.administrator de bonis non cum testamento annexo (DBNCTA) A baffling title for an administrator appointed by a probate court to take over probate proceedings when the named executor dies, leaving the job unfinished.administrator pendente lite Latin for 'administrator pending litigation.' This term refers to the person appointed by a court to begin probate proceedings during a lawsuit that challenges the will. The administrator pendente lite takes an inventory of the deceased person's property and handles the business affairs of the estate until the dispute is settled. Also called a special administrator.administrator with will annexed An administrator who takes the place of an executor under a will. The administrator steps in either when a will fails to nominate an executor or the named executor is unable to serve. Also called administrator cum testamento annexo or CTA, the Latin version of 'with the will annexed.'

TESTAMENTARY TRUST

A trust created by a will, effective only upon the death of the willmaker.

BANKRUPTCY ESTATE

All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankrup... (more...)
All of the property you own when you file for bankruptcy, except for most pensions and educational trusts. The trustee technically takes control of your bankruptcy estate for the duration of your case.

NONPROBATE

The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surv... (more...)
The distribution of a deceased person's property by any means other than probate. Many types of property pass free of probate, including property left to a surviving spouse and property left outside of a will through probate-avoidance methods such as pay-on-death designations, joint tenancy ownership, living trusts and life insurance. Property that avoids probate is sometimes described as the 'nonprobate estate.' Nonprobate distribution may also occur if the deceased person leaves an invalid will. In that case, property will pass according to the particular state's laws of intestate succession.

INHERIT

To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will... (more...)
To receive property from someone who has died. Traditionally, the word 'inherit' applied only when one received property from a relative who died without a will. Currently, however, the word is used whenever someone receives property from the estate of a deceased person.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

HOLOGRAPHIC WILL

A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many stat... (more...)
A will that is completely handwritten, dated and signed by the person making it. Holographic wills are generally not witnessed. Although it's legal in many states, making a holographic will is never advised except as a last resort.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Schneider v. Finmann

... maintain an action for legal malpractice. We now reverse and reinstate plaintiff's claim. Strict privity, as applied in the context of estate planning malpractice actions, is a minority rule in the United States. [1] In New York, a third ...

Fielding v. Kupferman

... The documents at issue in Bishop were estate planning instruments executed by the plaintiff who believed that he was giving his wife a life estate and was not limiting his access to his life savings (Bishop, 33 AD3d 497, 501 [2006], affd 9 NY3d 910 [2007]). ...

Kram Knarf, LLC v. Djonovic

... The client's malpractice complaint was silent as to how the attorneys misled him, what they failed to explain to him concerning the estate planning documents he executed, and which of his instructions those documents did not reflect (33 AD3d at 498-499). ...