North Tazewell Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Virginia


James P Carmody Lawyer

James P Carmody

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy, Family Law, Credit & Debt

Since 1976, Mr. Carmody has provided outstanding legal services for bankruptcy, divorce, custody issues, and adoption proceedings to clients in the gr... (more)

Jeffrey Lynn Campbell Lawyer

Jeffrey Lynn Campbell

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Litigation

Jeffrey L. Campbell has an extensive and diverse litigation background and has tried hundreds of cases before both state and federal courts. His prac... (more)

Robert Maurice Galumbeck

DUI-DWI, Divorce, Personal Injury, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Bradley C. Ratliff

Accident & Injury, Real Estate, Criminal, Estate, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

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Hugh Lee Harrell

Administrative Law, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gerald Douglas Arrington

DUI-DWI, Divorce, Personal Injury, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           

Stephen Wayne Gooch

Real Estate, Adoption, Business, Bankruptcy, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly Culbertson Haugh

Litigation, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Johnny L. Rosenbaum

Divorce, DUI-DWI, Civil Rights, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

QMSCO

See Qualified Medical Child Support Order.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

CONFINEMENT IN PRISON

In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of ... (more...)
In most states with fault divorce, grounds for a spouse not in prison to obtain a fault divorce if the other spouse has been imprisoned for a certain number of years.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

ARREARAGES

Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged i... (more...)
Overdue alimony or child support payments. In recent years, state laws have made it difficult to impossible to get rid of arrearages; they can't be discharged in bankruptcy, and courts usually will not retroactively cancel them. A spouse or parent who falls on tough times and is unable to make payments should request a temporary modification of the payments before the arrearages build up.