Richmond Misdemeanor Lawyer, Ohio


Kristopher Michael Haught

Real Estate, Family Law, Criminal, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Amanda Jo Abrams

Federal Appellate Practice, Government, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  19 Years

Adrian Vernon Hershey

Federal Appellate Practice, Family Law, Criminal, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

John Richard Shaffer

Litigation, Workers' Compensation, Employment, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Frank Joseph Bruzzese

Corporate, Personal Injury, Criminal, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  47 Years

Frank Wesley Noble

Juvenile Law, Estate, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

John Joseph Mascio

Juvenile Law, Estate, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  56 Years

Jane M. Hanlin

Health Care Other, Government, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Michelle Garcia Miller

Juvenile Law, Family Law, Criminal, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Matthew Paul Puskarich

Government, Environmental Law Other, Criminal, Religious Discrimination
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

IMPRISON

To put a person in prison or jail or otherwise confine him as punishment for committing a crime.

ASSAULT

A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical co... (more...)
A crime that occurs when one person tries to physically harm another in a way that makes the person under attack feel immediately threatened. Actual physical contact is not necessary; threatening gestures that would alarm any reasonable person can constitute an assault. Compare battery.

SENTENCE

Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by ... (more...)
Punishment in a criminal case. A sentence can range from a fine and community service to life imprisonment or death. For most crimes, the sentence is chosen by the trial judge; the jury chooses the sentence only in a capital case, when it must choose between life in prison without parole and death.

WARRANT

See search warrant or arrest warrant.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

EXECUTIVE PRIVILEGE

The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communicatio... (more...)
The privilege that allows the president and other high officials of the executive branch to keep certain communications private if disclosing those communications would disrupt the functions or decisionmaking processes of the executive branch. As demonstrated by the Watergate hearings, this privilege does not extend to information germane to a criminal investigation.

HABEAS CORPUS

Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continu... (more...)
Latin for 'You have the body.' A prisoner files a petition for writ of habeas corpus in order to challenge the authority of the prison or jail warden to continue to hold him. If the judge orders a hearing after reading the writ, the prisoner gets to argue that his confinement is illegal. These writs are frequently filed by convicted prisoners who challenge their conviction on the grounds that the trial attorney failed to prepare the defense and was incompetent. Prisoners sentenced to death also file habeas petitions challenging the constitutionality of the state death penalty law. Habeas writs are different from and do not replace appeals, which are arguments for reversal of a conviction based on claims that the judge conducted the trial improperly. Often, convicted prisoners file both.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Futrall

... Facts. {¶ 2} In May 2001, defendant-appellant, Douglas Futrall, was indicted on five criminal offenses: (1) aggravated menacing in violation of RC 2903.21(A), a first-degree misdemeanor, (2) improper handling of firearms in violation of RC 2923.16(B), a first-degree misdemeanor ...

Cleveland Hts. v. Lewis

... {¶ 1} The Eighth District Court of Appeals certified that a conflict exists between its decision in this case and decisions of the Second and Seventh District Courts of Appeals on the following question: "Whether an appeal is rendered moot when a misdemeanor defendant serves ...

State v. Downie

... The right to counsel extends to misdemeanor criminal cases that could result in the imposition of a jail sentence. ... {¶ 21} Appellant was charged with misdemeanor offenses, which are the type of petty offenses referred to in Crim.R. 44. ...