Rock Springs Bankruptcy Lawyer, Wyoming


Includes: Bankruptcy Litigation, Commercial Bankruptcy, Consumer Bankruptcy, Dissolution

Clark D. Stith

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Christian Thomas Brower

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

Nathan Wynn Jeppsen

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Hilary K. Brewster

Divorce & Family Law, Collection, Business, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Stan Decker Cannon

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Craig L. Jones

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Lauren Renee Radakovich

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years

Daniel E. Erramouspe

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Eric Frederick Phillips

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  14 Years

Robert W. Hiatt

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

COLLATERAL

Property that guarantees payment of a secured debt.

INFRINGEMENT (OF TRADEMARK)

Unauthorized use of a protected trademark or service mark, or use of something very similar to a protected mark. The success of a lawsuit to stop the infringeme... (more...)
Unauthorized use of a protected trademark or service mark, or use of something very similar to a protected mark. The success of a lawsuit to stop the infringement turns on whether the defendant's use causes a likelihood of confusion in the average consumer. If a court determines that the average consumer would be confused, the owner of the original mark can prevent the other's use of the infringing mark and sometimes collect damages.

CREDIT BUREAU

A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit... (more...)
A private, profit-making company that collects and sells information about a person's credit history. Typical clients include banks, mortgage lenders and credit card companies that use the information to screen applicants for loans and credit cards. There are three major credit bureaus, Equifax, Experian and Trans Union, and they are regulated by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act.

BULK SALES LAW

A law that regulates the transfer of business assets so that business owners cannot dispose of assets in order to avoid creditors. If a business owner wants to ... (more...)
A law that regulates the transfer of business assets so that business owners cannot dispose of assets in order to avoid creditors. If a business owner wants to conduct a bulk sale of business assets -- that is, get rid of an unusually large amount of inventory, merchandise or equipment -- the business owner must typically publish a notice of the sale and give written notice to creditors. Then, the owner must set up an account to hold the funds from the sale for a brief period of time during which creditors may make claims against the money. The prohibition against bulk sales is spelled out in the Uniform Commercial Code -- and laws modeled on the UCC have been generally adopted throughout the country.

UNSECURED DEBT

A debt that is not tied to any item of property. A creditor doesn't have the right to grab property to satisfy the debt if you default. The creditor's only reme... (more...)
A debt that is not tied to any item of property. A creditor doesn't have the right to grab property to satisfy the debt if you default. The creditor's only remedy is to sue you and get a judgment. Compare secured debt.

C CORPORATION

Common business slang to distinguish a corporation whose profits are taxed separate from its owners under subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code, from an S c... (more...)
Common business slang to distinguish a corporation whose profits are taxed separate from its owners under subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code, from an S corporation, whose profits are passed through to shareholders and taxed on their personal returns under subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code.

REDEMPTION

In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump s... (more...)
In Chapter 7 bankruptcy, when the debtor obtains legal title to collateral for a debt by paying the creditor the replacement value of the collateral in a lump sum. For example, a debtor may redeem a car note by paying the lender the amount a retail vendor would charge for the car, considering its age and condition.

CHAPTER 13 PLAN

A document filed in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in which the debtor shows how all of his or her disposable income will be used over a three- to five-year period to ... (more...)
A document filed in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in which the debtor shows how all of his or her disposable income will be used over a three- to five-year period to pay all mandatory debts -- for example, back child support, taxes, and mortgage arrearages -- as well as some or all unsecured, nonpriority debts, such as medical and credit card bills.

NONEXEMPT PROPERTY

The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typicall... (more...)
The property you risk losing to your creditors when you file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy or when a creditor sues you and wins a judgment. Nonexempt property typically includes valuable clothing (furs) and electronic equipment, an expensive car that's been paid off and most of the equity in your house. Compare exempt property.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Ringolsby v. Johnson

... to post an appeal bond in the amount of the judgment. The Johnsons instead decided to file bankruptcy on behalf of Dalmac Construction, Inc., in an effort to avoid paying the judgment in the underlying action. ... filed for bankruptcy. ...

CATAMOUNT CONST. v. TIMMIS ENTERPRISES

... The subcontractors filed motions to dismiss, asserting that Catamount had no standing to maintain its suit because it was defunct as the result of bankruptcy. ... [¶ 5] On June 10, 2005, Catamount filed a voluntary petition for bankruptcy under Chapter 7 of the Bankruptcy Code. ...

Cross v. State

... The instruments purported to have been signed and notarized in 2000. Shortly after recording the instruments, the appellant "took bankruptcy," and he did not list the overriding royalty interests as assets of the bankruptcy estate. ...