Rowesville Trusts Lawyer, South Carolina


Glenn Fishburne Givens Lawyer

Glenn Fishburne Givens

VERIFIED
Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Administration, Power of Attorney
My goal is to provide clients very good legal services at a very good price.

Mr. Givens is a 1991 graduate of Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, where he received a degree in business (B.S.) with honors. He... (more)

Anton W Sterba

Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Melvin D Williamson

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  30 Years
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Henrietta Gill

Real Estate, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

INVENTORY

A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or admini... (more...)
A complete listing of all property owned by a deceased person at the time of death. The inventory is filed with the court during probate. The executor or administrator of the estate is responsible for making and filing the inventory.

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

SELF-PROVING WILL

A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-prov... (more...)
A will that is created in a way that allows a probate court to easily accept it as the true will of the person who has died. In most states, a will is self-proving when two witnesses sign under penalty of perjury that they observed the willmaker sign it and that he told them it was his will. If no one contests the validity of the will, the probate court will accept the will without hearing the testimony of the witnesses or other evidence. To make a self-proving will in other states, the willmaker and one or more witnesses must sign an affidavit (sworn statement) before a notary public certifying that the will is genuine and that all willmaking formalities have been observed.

CONTINGENT BENEFICIARY

1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisf... (more...)
1) An alternate beneficiary named in a will, trust or other document. 2) Any person entitled to property under a will if one or more prior conditions are satisfied. For example, if Fred is entitled to take property under a will only if he's married at the time of the will maker's death, Fred is a contingent beneficiary. Similarly, if Ellen is named to receive a house only in the event her mother, who has been named to live in the house, moves out of it, Ellen is a contingent beneficiary.

POUR-OVER WILL

A will that 'pours over' property into a trust when the will maker dies. Property left through the will must go through probate before it goes into the trust.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

All Saints Parish v. Episcopal Church

385 SC 428 (2009). 685 SE2d 163. ALL SAINTS PARISH WACCAMAW, a South Carolina Non-profit Corporation; D. Clinch Heyward, Warden for All Saints Parish, Waccamaw; W. Russell Campbell, Warden for All Saints Parish ...

O'BRIEN v. South Carolina ORBIT

... However, GASB 45 does not establish what kind of investments in which the trust must invest. In connection with this case, John Garrett, a member of the American Academy of Actuaries, reviewed types of trusts to determine the rate of return. ... investment trusts ... ...

O'BRIEN v. ORBIT

... However, GASB 45 does not establish what kind of investments in which the trust must invest. In connection with this case, John Garrett, a member of the American Academy of Actuaries, reviewed types of trusts to determine the rate of return. ... investment trusts . . . ...