Saint Charles Real Estate Lawyer, Arkansas


Warren D. A. Jennings

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  52 Years

Lester A. McKinley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Lester A. Mckinley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Warren D. A. Jennings

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  52 Years
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Rufus Thomas Buie

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Mary Christina Boyd

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Gena Milliken Jennings

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Bradley Alton Chambless

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

B Park Park Eldridge

Government
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  20 Years

Oscar Stilley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

COVENANTS, CONDITIONS & RESTRICTIONS (CC&RS)

The restrictions governing the use of real estate, usually enforced by a homeowners' association and passed on to the new owners of property. For example, CC&Rs... (more...)
The restrictions governing the use of real estate, usually enforced by a homeowners' association and passed on to the new owners of property. For example, CC&Rs may tell you how big your house can be, how you must landscape your yard or whether you can have pets. If property is subject to CC&Rs, buyers must be notified before the sale takes place.

INCIDENTS OF OWNERSHIP

Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to... (more...)
Any control over property. If you give away property but keep an incident of ownership--for example, you give away an apartment building but retain the right to receive rent--then legally, no gift has been made. This distinction can be important if you're making large gifts to reduce your eventual estate tax.

LEASE

An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an ... (more...)
An oral or written agreement (a contract) between two people concerning the use by one of the property of the other. A person can lease real estate (such as an apartment or business property) or personal property (such as a car or a boat). A lease should cover basic issues such as when the lease will begin and end, the rent or other costs, how payments should be made, and any restrictions on the use of the property. The property owner is often called the 'lessor,' and the person using the property is called the 'lessee.'

NULLA BONA

Latin for 'no goods.' This is what the sheriff writes when she can find no property to seize in order to pay off a court judgment.

UNCONSCIONABILITY

A seller's taking advantage of a buyer due to their unequal bargaining positions, perhaps because of the buyer's recent trauma, physical infirmity, ignorance, i... (more...)
A seller's taking advantage of a buyer due to their unequal bargaining positions, perhaps because of the buyer's recent trauma, physical infirmity, ignorance, inability to read or inability to understand the language. The unfairness must be so severe that it is shocking to the average person. It usually includes the absence of any meaningful choice on the part of the buyer and contract terms so one-sided that they unreasonably favor the seller. A contract will be terminated if the buyer can prove unconscionability.

LEGACY

An outdated legal word meaning personal property left by a will. The more common term for this type of property is bequest. Compare devise.

MORTGAGE

A loan in which the borrower puts up the title to real estate as security (collateral) for a loan. If the borrower doesn't pay back the debt on time, the lender... (more...)
A loan in which the borrower puts up the title to real estate as security (collateral) for a loan. If the borrower doesn't pay back the debt on time, the lender can foreclose on the real estate and have it sold to pay off the loan.

MEMORANDUM

(1) An informal written document. A memorandum may be used in any number of circumstances, but most lawyers are best acquainted with the interoffice memorandum-... (more...)
(1) An informal written document. A memorandum may be used in any number of circumstances, but most lawyers are best acquainted with the interoffice memorandum--a document prepared by a junior associate in a law office or a judge's law clerk outlining the facts, procedural elements and legal arguments involved in a particular legal matter. These memos are reviewed by senior lawyers and judges who use them to decide how to proceed with the case. (2) Any written record, including a letter or note, that proves that a contract exists between two parties. This type of memo may be enough to validate an oral (spoken) contract that would otherwise be unenforceable because of the statute of frauds. (Under the statute of frauds, an oral contract is invalid if it can't be completed within one year from the date the contract is made.)

DOMINANT TENEMENT

Property that carries a right to use a portion of a neighboring property. For example, property that benefits from a beach access trail across another property ... (more...)
Property that carries a right to use a portion of a neighboring property. For example, property that benefits from a beach access trail across another property is the dominant tenement.

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