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Santa Clara Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, California


Diego  MacWilliam Lawyer

Diego MacWilliam

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Prenuptial Agreements

The Law Office of Diego F. MacWilliam has been in practice throughout the San Francisco Bay Area for over 20 years. The firm handles divorce, legal s... (more)

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Paul Alexander Lovrich Lawyer

Paul Alexander Lovrich

VERIFIED
Family Law, Visa, Landlord-Tenant, Intellectual Property

Our practice is primarily family law and immigration law, assisting clients in what can be the most strenuous time of their lives. We provide compr... (more)

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800-750-5991

Wesley J. Schroeder Lawyer

Wesley J. Schroeder

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Juvenile Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect

While I was always interested in a legal career as I grew up and went through my years of education, it was not until I became quite involved in the c... (more)

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David  Yomtov Lawyer

David Yomtov

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law
Family Law Practioner

David Yomtov has been practicing law in Santa Clara County since 1993. He has always focused on the needs of his clients to deal with their domestic l... (more)

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Thomas E. Bouman

Administrative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Bankruptcy, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Brian E. Hawes

Corporate, Contract, Employment, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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David A. Patton

Family Law, Construction, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Mitchell T. Ehrlich

Products Liability, Family Law, Corporate, Employment, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marilla J. Ronald

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Gina N. Policastri

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.