Santa Rosa Child Support Lawyer, California

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Susan Daniel

Dispute Resolution, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joel R. Rubin

Dispute Resolution, Child Support, Collaborative Law, Farms
Status:  In Good Standing           

Marla Dawn Keenan

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

Morna G. Challoner

Farms, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years
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Gregory S. Futch

Dispute Resolution, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years

Robert Marmor

Dispute Resolution, Collaborative Law, Family Law, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Stephen R. Olsen

Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Arbitration, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  35 Years

Jeff N. Zimmerman

Family Law, Child Support, Child Custody, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Ronald James Cassells

Alimony & Spousal Support, Animal Bite, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Katherine Page Nowell

Dispute Resolution, Collaborative Law, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  Suspended           Licensed:  3 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

DEFAULT DIVORCE

See uncontested divorce.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

PETITIONER

A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly div... (more...)
A person who initiates a lawsuit. A synonym for plaintiff, used almost universally in some states and in others for certain types of lawsuits, most commonly divorce and other family law cases.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

CONNIVANCE

A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adul... (more...)
A situation set up so that another person commits a wrongdoing. For example, a husband who invites his wife's lover along on vacation may have connived her adultery, and if he tried to divorce her for her behavior, she could assert his connivance as a defense.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

PATERNITY SUIT

A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the fath... (more...)
A lawsuit to determine the identity of the father of a child born outside of marriage, and to provide for the support of the child once the identity of the father has been determined.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

SAN MATEO COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF CHILD SUPPORT SERVICES v. Clark

An order setting aside or vacating a paternity judgment pursuant to Family Code [1] section 7645 et seq. must rest on proof of exclusion of biological paternity as evidenced by genetic test results. The trial court granted the motion of respondent Dennis Henry Clark II (Clark) to ...

PLUMAS COUNTY CHILD SUPPORT v. Rodriquez

The Plumas County Department of Child Support Services (county) appeals from an order dismissing its complaint against Ame R. Rodriquez, by which it sought to compel Rodriquez to pay support for her 18-year-old son Joshua who, after living with Rodriquez nearly all of his life, began ...

Adoption of Allison C.

... Specifically, stepfather and mother sought to have father's parental rights terminated under section 7822, alleging father had left Allison in mother's custody for at least four years, had "never paid or offered to pay child support since Allison's 1009 birth," and had "not had any ...