Sarasota Estate Planning Lawyer, Florida


Includes: Gift Taxation

David Wayne Wilcox Lawyer

David Wayne Wilcox

VERIFIED
Business, Real Estate, Estate Planning, Entertainment, Mediation

David W. Wilcox, attorney at law, is located two blocks from the Manatee County Court House in downtown Bradenton. The firm has extensive experience p... (more)

Cecilia Ann Eaton Lawyer

Cecilia Ann Eaton

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate Planning

Ms. Eaton proudly serves clients concentrating on Divorce & Family Law but also helps clients with Estate Planning matters and Juvenile Dependency iss... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-761-6211

Jay  Kovar Lawyer

Jay Kovar

VERIFIED
Property Damage, Slip & Fall Accident, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate, Credit & Debt

Mr. Kovar is the founder and driving force of Elysium Law. However, he wasn’t always an attorney. Mr. Kovar was most recently the owner of a constru... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-851-4860

Elizabeth A. Walch

Condominiums, Trusts, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

J. Allison Archbold

Tax, Wills, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

J. Ronald Skipper

Wills, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Burton M. Romanoff

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Tax, Transactions
Status:  In Good Standing           

James O. Fergeson

Business Organization, Contract, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

E. John Lopez

Corporate, Business Organization, Estate Administration, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Janelle L. Esposito

Business Organization, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Sarasota Estate Planning Lawyers and Sarasota Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

GRANTOR

Someone who creates a trust. Also called a trustor or settlor.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

BENEFICIARY

A person or organization legally entitled to receive benefits through a legal device, such as a will, trust or life insurance policy.

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

CERTIFIED COPY

A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certi... (more...)
A copy of a document issued by a court or government agency guaranteed to be a true and exact copy of the original. Many agencies and institutions require certified copies of legal documents before permitting certain transactions. For example, a certified copy of a death certificate is required before a bank will release the funds in a deceased person's payable-on-death account to the person who has inherited them.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

KINDRED

Under some state's probate codes, all relatives of a deceased person.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Brundage v. Bank of America

... disputed transfers from the trust. Dorothy Gutsgell and her husband, who had no children of their own, executed a series of estate planning documents, using the law firm of Ruden McClosky for their planning. In 1992 Dorothy, as ...

Yang Enterprises, Inc. v. Georgalis

... Petitioners filed suit against Respondent for trade secret theft, tortious interference with a business relationship, and trade libel. In 1999, Petitioners retained Anthony Palma, an attorney in Broad and Cassel's Orlando office, for estate planning services. ...

Wheeler v. Powers

... In 2000, Dorothy L. Powers and her husband, Albert Powers, retained Kenneth B. Wheeler, an estates and trust attorney, to prepare estate planning documents. ... [1]. On December 20, 2004, Dorothy created several new estate planning documents through a different attorney. ...