Shrewsbury Estate Planning Lawyer, New Jersey

Sponsored Law Firm


Includes: Gift Taxation

Kevin I. Asadi Lawyer

Kevin I. Asadi

Real Estate Other, Land Use & Zoning, Landlord-Tenant, Tax Litigation, Estate Planning

Kevin I. Asadi received his B.S. from Rutgers University School of Business and his J.D. from Seton Hall University School of Law. During law school, ... (more)

Lawrence M Fuchs

Business Organization, Wills & Probate, Construction, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           

Donald R. Ambrose

Foreclosure, Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Janice Davis Miller

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

K. Edward Jacobi

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Andrew W Krantz

Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Corporate, Franchising
Status:  In Good Standing           

Dana A. Bennett

Business Organization, Business Successions, Gift Taxation, Estate Administration
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael T. Warshaw

Government Agencies, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

John G. Koufos

Criminal, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find Shrewsbury Estate Planning Lawyers and Shrewsbury Estate Planning Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

TRUST MERGER

Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separati... (more...)
Under a trust, the situation that occurs when the sole trustee and the sole beneficiary are the same person or institution. Then, there's no longer the separation between the trustee's legal ownership of trust property from the beneficiary's interest. The trust 'merges' and ceases to exist.

MINERAL RIGHTS

An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral right... (more...)
An ownership interest in the minerals contained in a particular parcel of land, with or without ownership of the surface of the land. The owner of mineral rights is usually entitled to either take the minerals from the land himself or receive a royalty from the party that actually extracts the minerals.

MARITAL LIFE ESTATE TRUST

See AB trust.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

GRANTOR RETAINED INCOME TRUST

Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for ... (more...)
Irrevocable trusts designed to save on estate tax. There are several kinds; with all of them, you keep income from trust property, or use of that property, for a period of years. When the trust ends, the property goes to the final beneficiaries you've named. These trusts are for people who have enough wealth to feel comfortable giving away a substantial hunk of property. They come in three flavors: Grantor-Retained Annuity Trusts (GRATs), Grantor-Retained Unitrusts (GRUTs) and Grantor-Retained Income Trusts (GRITs).

PER STIRPES

Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. F... (more...)
Under a will, a method of determining who inherits property when a joint beneficiary has died before the willmaker, leaving living children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property 'per stirpes,' Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation). If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that the property is to be divided per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third.

RESIDUARY ESTATE

The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court c... (more...)
The property that remains in a deceased person's estate after all specific gifts are made, and all debts, taxes, administrative fees, probate costs, and court costs are paid. The residuary estate also includes any gifts under a will that fail or lapse. For example, Connie's will leaves her house and all its furnishings to Andrew, her VW bug to her friend Carl, and the remainder of her property (the residuary estate) to her sister Sara. She doesn't name any alternate beneficiaries. Carl dies before Connie. The VW bug becomes part of the residuary estate and passes to Sara, along with all of Connie's property other than the house and furnishings. Also called the residual estate or residue.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Shotmeyer v. NJ Realty Title Ins. Co.

... or conveyance of such estate or interest. . . . As part of their estate planning, the Shotmeyers formed the limited partnership, Beaver Run Farms, LP, on December 30, 1991. SB Properties, Inc., a corporation owned jointly and ...

In re Estate of Stockdale

953 A.2d 454 (2008). 196 NJ 275. In the Matter of the ESTATE OF Madeleine L. STOCKDALE, Deceased. A-121 September Term 2006. Supreme Court of New Jersey. Argued October 9, 2007. Decided July 22, 2008. 457 Frederick ...

Finderne Mgmt. Co. v. Barrett

... The brothers agreed that additional estate planning strategies "such as retitling assets, new wills, new trusts, and some other financial planning" techniques were necessary to "reduce the estate tax[es] down to a meaningful level" and, in planning for their retirement, to provide a ...