Springfield Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Illinois

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Charles S. Watson

Divorce & Family Law, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           

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J. Randall Cox

Family Law, Construction, Wills, Personal Injury
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Brian Jay Dees

Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Administrative Law, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

Howard W. Feldman

Construction, Estate Planning, Divorce, Criminal
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Michelle L. Blackburn

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Almon A. Manson

Affirmative Action, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption, Americans with Disabilities Act
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Amy Keil Schmidt

Litigation, Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Ted Harvatin

Traffic, Workers' Compensation, Divorce, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kelli E. Gordon

Farms, Divorce, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

Randy S. Paswater

International Tax, Family Law, Divorce, Transactions
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

RESPONDENT

A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must r... (more...)
A term used instead of defendant or appellee in some states -- especially for divorce and other family law cases -- to identify the party who is sued and must respond to the petitioner's complaint.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

MARITAL TERMINATION AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

ADOPTIVE PARENT

A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is deter... (more...)
A person who completes all the requirements to legally adopt a child who is not his or her biological child. Generally, any single or married adult who is determined to be a 'fit parent' may adopt a child. Some states have special requirements, such as age or residency criteria. An adoptive parent has all the responsibilities of a biological parent.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE

An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge ... (more...)
An order from a judge that directs a party to come to court and convince the judge why she shouldn't grant an action proposed by the other side or by the judge on her own (sua sponte). For example, in a divorce, at the request of one parent a judge might issue an order directing the other parent to appear in court on a particular date and time to show cause why the first parent should not be given sole physical custody of the children. Although it would seem that the person receiving an order to show cause is at a procedural disadvantage--she, after all, is the one who is told to come up with a convincing reason why the judge shouldn't order something--both sides normally have an equal chance to convince the judge to rule in their favor.

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