Stone Mountain Estate Lawyer, Georgia

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John Joseph McManus Lawyer

John Joseph McManus

VERIFIED
Bankruptcy, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Lawsuit & Dispute
We Provide the Highest Quality Services to Our Clients

My law firm is currently focused on debtor and creditor bankruptcy, business and personal, as well as handling real estate matters, including closings... (more)

Laurene Cristine Cuvillier Lawyer

Laurene Cristine Cuvillier

VERIFIED
Wills & Probate, Special Education, Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy

Laurene Cuvillier is an attorney who is a partner in the Decatur, Georgia, law firm of Goldberg & Cuvillier, P. C. The firm’s practice includes rep... (more)

William Hansel Kitchens Lawyer

William Hansel Kitchens

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Accident & Injury, Car Accident, Wills & Probate

Specializing in Family and Criminal Law. Also proficient in personal injury, probate, landlord-tennant land juvenile practice.

John G. Walrath Lawyer

John G. Walrath

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy & Debt, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Estate
General Practice Attorney in Metro Atlanta

The Law Offices of John G. Walrath is a small, aggressive and experienced Georgia law firm handling both civil and criminal cases throughout the State... (more)

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Robert E. Turner

Tax, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

William R. Claiborne

Adoption, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy K. Wallas

Adoption, Estate Administration, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Living Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Howard Jay Kent

Estate Administration, Workout, Consumer Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Russel Davis Moore

Contract, Estate Planning, Family Law, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

John Edward Starbuck

Business, Estate, Social Security -- Disability, Bad Faith Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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Lawyer.com can help you easily and quickly find Stone Mountain Estate Lawyers and Stone Mountain Estate Law Firms. Refine your search by specific Estate practice areas such as Estate Planning, Trusts, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney matters.

LEGAL TERMS

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRANSFER TAX

A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 ... (more...)
A federal tax imposed on money placed in a generation-skipping trust. Currently, there is a $1 million exemption to the GSTT; that is, each person may leave $1 million in a generation-skipping trust free of this tax. The GSST is imposed when the middle-generation beneficiaries die and the property is transferred to the third-generation beneficiaries. Every dollar over $1 million is subject to the highest existing estate tax rate--currently 55%--at the time the GSTT tax is applied.

QDOT TRUST

A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spo... (more...)
A trust used to postpone estate tax when more than the amount of the personal federal estate tax exemption is left to a non-U.S. citizen spouse by the other spouse. QDOT stands for qualified domestic trust.

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

LETTERS TESTAMENTARY

The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succes... (more...)
The document given to an executor by the probate court, authorizing the executor to settle the estate according to either a will or the state's intestate succession laws.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

PERSONAL PROPERTY

All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, p... (more...)
All property other than land and buildings attached to land. Cars, bank accounts, wages, securities, a small business, furniture, insurance policies, jewelry, patents, pets and season baseball tickets are all examples of personal property. Personal property may also be called personal effects, movable property, goods and chattel, and personalty. Compare real estate.

DISCHARGE (OF PROBATE ADMINISTRATOR)

A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties hav... (more...)
A court order releasing the administrator or executor from any further duties connected with the probate of an estate. This typically occurs when the duties have been completed but may happen sooner if the executor or administrator wishes to withdraw or is dismissed.

AUGMENTED ESTATE

In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used on... (more...)
In general terms, an augmented estate consists of property owned by both a deceased person and his or her spouse. The concept of the augmented estate is used only in some states. Its value is calculated only if a surviving spouse declines whatever he or she was left by will and instead claims a share of the deceased spouse's estate. (This is called taking against the will.) The amount of this 'statutory share' or 'elective share' depends on state law.