Susquehanna County, PA Child Custody Lawyers


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Jason Guy Beardsley

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura Kristine Kail

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  34 Years

Jeffrey Rogers Norris

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Francis X. O'Connor

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  43 Years
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William A. Aileo

General Practice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  44 Years

Linda Lemay Labarbera

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Myron Byrd Dewitt

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  38 Years

Michael James Gathany

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Raymond C. Davis

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  49 Years

Patrick Michael Daly

General Practice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  16 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

IN CAMERA

Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from t... (more...)
Latin for 'in chambers.' A legal proceeding is 'in camera' when a hearing is held before the judge in her private chambers or when the public is excluded from the courtroom. Proceedings are often held in camera to protect victims and witnesses from public exposure, especially if the victim or witness is a child. There is still, however, a record made of the proceeding, typically by a court stenographer. The judge may decide to seal this record if the material is extremely sensitive or likely to prejudice one side or the other.

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

PHYSICAL INCAPACITY

The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divor... (more...)
The inability of a spouse to engage in sexual intercourse with the other spouse. In some states, physical incapacity is a ground for an annulment or fault divorce, assuming the incapacity was not disclosed to the other spouse before the marriage.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Bouzos-Reilly v. Reilly

... Thus, we reverse. [1]. 645 ¶ 2 We recognize that the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act ("UCCJEA"), 23 Pa.CS § 5401, et seq., is designed to eliminate a rush to the courthouse to determine jurisdiction. ... [2] § 5421. Initial child custody jurisdiction. ...

Billhime v. Billhime

... On February 28, 2007, Mother responded by filing a motion requesting that the trial court relinquish jurisdiction over this child custody action to the Circuit Court for the 9th Judicial Circuit in and for Orange County, Florida. Following ...

AD v. MAB

... 1 MAB ("Father") appeals from the order entered in the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas, which declined jurisdiction in this child custody matter in ... With any child custody case, the paramount concern is the best interests of the child. Landis, supra, 869 A.2d at 1011. ...

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