Tucson Family Law Lawyer, Arizona


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Ron Reyna

Family Law, Divorce, Farms, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Leo M. Plowman

Gaming & Alcohol, Agriculture, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ralph E. Ellinwood

Family Law, White Collar Crime, Contract, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Riisa Petersen

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Cheryl Cardoza Cayce

Family Law, Trusts, Elder Law, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  33 Years

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Richard B. Geller

Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, DUI-DWI, Felony, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Carl D. Macpherson

Divorce & Family Law, Paternity, Child Custody, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thabet Nazif Khalidi

Health Care, Family Law, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Merle L. Stolar

Gift Taxation, Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Douglas Tyler Francis

Family Law, Child Support, DUI-DWI, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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Easily find Tucson Family Law Lawyers and Tucson Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

ADOPT

(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative bo... (more...)
(1) To assume the legal relationship of parent to another person's child. See also adoption. (2) To approve or accept something -- for example, a legislative body may adopt a law or an amendment, a government agency may adopt a regulation or a party to a lawsuit may adopt a particular argument.

CONSUMMATION

The actualization of a marriage. Sexual intercourse is required to 'consummate' a marriage. Failure to do so is grounds for divorce or annulment.

TENANCY BY THE ENTIRETY

A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the su... (more...)
A special kind of property ownership that's only for married couples. Both spouses have the right to enjoy the entire property, and when one spouse dies, the surviving spouse gets title to the property (called a right of survivorship). It is similar to joint tenancy, but it is available in only about half the states.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

MARRIAGE

The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the... (more...)
The legal union of two people. Once a couple is married, their rights and responsibilities toward one another concerning property and support are defined by the laws of the state in which they live. A marriage can only be terminated by a court granting a divorce or annulment. Compare common law marriage.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

DESERTION

The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home f... (more...)
The voluntary abandonment of one spouse by the other, without the abandoned spouse's consent. Commonly, desertion occurs when a spouse leaves the marital home for a specified length of time. Desertion is a grounds for divorce in states with fault divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kline v. Kline

... B. Pleading Standards. ¶ 13 The Arizona Rules of Family Law Procedure generally apply to all family law cases pending as of January 1, 2006. ... [1] Arizona Rules of Family Law Procedure. [2] It is remarkable that a case so actively litigated would result in a default judgment. ...

Craig v. Craig

... Husband timely filed a motion for new trial or to amend the decree under Arizona Rules of Family Law Procedure 83 and 84. Before the court ruled on Husband's motion, however, Wife filed a notice of appeal. Husband then cross-appealed. ...

Ezell v. Quon

... Quon. Moreover, when Quon failed to petition for review of this court's dismissal of his appeal for lack of jurisdiction, it became the law of the case and he is precluded from challenging that ruling here. See State v. Kiles, 222 Ariz. ...