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Walnut Creek Trusts Lawyer, California


Nathan  Pastor Lawyer

Nathan Pastor

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Litigation, Wills & Probate, Trusts

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M. Franklin Parrish

Contract, Estate Planning, Litigation, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Matthew S. Toth

Estate Planning, Family Law, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Stanley Pedder

Wills & Probate, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Joseph Morrill

Litigation, Wills & Probate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Matthew B. Talbot

Trusts, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Estate Administration, Guardianships & Conservatorships
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  11 Years

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Williem Bard

Litigation, Real Estate, Elder Law, Trusts, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

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Ruth Koller Burke

Estate Planning, Litigation, Trusts, Wills & Probate, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Linda Slider

Trusts, Wills, Gift Taxation, Business
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Jenny Sweetland

Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

800-923-0641

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LEGAL TERMS

SECONDARY MEANING

In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use ... (more...)
In trademark law, a mark that is not inherently distinctive becomes protected after developing a 'secondary meaning': great public recognition through long use and exposure in the marketplace. For example, though first names are not generally considered inherently distinctive, Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream has become so well known that it is now entitled to maximum trademark protection.

BEQUEATH

A legal term sometimes used in wills that means 'leave' -- for example, 'I bequeath my garden tools to my brother-in-law, Buster Jenkins.'

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

INTESTATE

The condition of dying without a valid will. The probate court appoints an administrator to distribute the deceased person's property according to state law.

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

ADEMPTION

The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she di... (more...)
The failure of a bequest of property in a will. The gift fails (is 'adeemed') because the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he or she dies. Often this happens because the property has been sold, destroyed or given away to someone other than the beneficiary named in the will. A bequest may also be adeemed when the will maker, while still living, gives the property to the intended beneficiary (called 'ademption by satisfaction'). When a bequest is adeemed, the beneficiary named in the will is out of luck; he or she doesn't get cash or a different item of property to replace the one that was described in the will. For example, Mark writes in his will, 'I leave to Rob the family vehicle,' but then trades in his car in for a jet ski. When Mark dies, Rob will receive nothing. Frustrated beneficiaries may challenge an ademption in court, especially if the property was not clearly identified in the first place.

PROVING A WILL

Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily sat... (more...)
Convincing a probate court that a document is truly the deceased person's will. Usually this is a simple formality that the executor or administrator easily satisfies by showing that the will was signed and dated by the deceased person in front of two or more witnesses. When the will is holographic -- that is, completely handwritten by the deceased and not witnessed, it is still valid in many states if the executor can produce relatives and friends to testify that the handwriting is that of the deceased.

DISINHERIT

To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit prope... (more...)
To deliberately prevent someone from inheriting something. This is usually done by a provision in a will stating that someone who would ordinarily inherit property -- a close family member, for example -- should not receive it. In most states, you cannot completely disinherit your spouse; a surviving spouse has the right to claim a portion (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's estate. With a few exceptions, however, you can expressly disinherit children.

ENTITY

An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from i... (more...)
An organization, institution or being that has its own existence for legal or tax purposes. An entity is often an organization with an existence separate from its individual members--for example, a corporation, partnership, trust, estate or government agency. The entity is treated like a person; it can function legally, be sued, and make decisions through agents.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Schwartz v. Labow

... The probate court's general jurisdiction encompasses "the internal affairs of trusts" and "[o]ther actions and proceedings involving trustees...." 17000, subds. ... 427 (2) The probate court has general power and duty to supervise the administration of trusts. ...

In re Estate of Young

... (a)(2)(D).) The trial court ruled that the Estate was the prevailing party, because it had showed sufficient evidence of undue influence and fraud in the establishment of the trusts. ... A. Creation of Land Trusts and Operational Trusts; Background. ...

Bilafer v. Bilafer

... SIMONS, Acting PJ. On December 30, 1999, Mitchell J. Bilafer (Mitchell) [1] executed two irrevocable trusts (collectively, the 1999 Trusts). In 2006, Mitchell filed petitions to reform the 1999 Trusts to conform them to his intent. ...