Wheaton Misdemeanor Lawyer, Illinois

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Timothy P. Martin Lawyer

Timothy P. Martin

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic, DUI-DWI
Former Felony Prosecutor

Timothy P. Martin, a resident of DuPage County, is a Partner with the LAW OFFICES OF MARTIN & KENT, LLC. Mr. Martin received his Juris Doctorate from ... (more)

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800-835-9510

Michael Francis McMahon Lawyer

Michael Francis McMahon

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime, Traffic

Criminal Lawyers Serving Oakbrook Terrace, Oak Brook, Elmhurst, and Throughout the Area In the moments after an arrest, it is common to experience ... (more)

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630-953-4400

Clarissa  Myers Lawyer

Clarissa Myers

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce & Family Law, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
DuPage attorney Clarissa R.E. Myers provides aggressivecriminal defense for DUI.

Ms. Myers is an experienced trial attorney who practices in the area of criminal defense, having completed hundreds of trials and motions in the defen... (more)

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CONTACT

844-984-3529

Kathryn L. Harry

Domestic Violence & Neglect, Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

MENS REA

The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental s... (more...)
The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental state (the mens rea). The mens rea of robbery, for example, is the intent to permanently deprive the owner of his property.

BAILOR

Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in or... (more...)
Someone who delivers an item of personal property to another person for a specific purpose. For example, a person who leaves a broken VCR with a repairman in order to get it fixed would be a bailor.

SPECIFIC INTENT

An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of ... (more...)
An intent to produce the precise consequences of the crime, including the intent to do the physical act that causes the consequences. For example, the crime of larceny is the taking of the personal property of another with the intent to permanently deprive the other person of the property. A person is not guilty of larceny just because he took someone else's property; it must be proven that he took it with the purpose of keeping it permanently.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

EXCLUSIONARY RULE

A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from ... (more...)
A rule of evidence that disallows the use of illegally obtained evidence in criminal trials. For example, the exclusionary rule would prevent a prosecutor from introducing at trial evidence seized during an illegal search.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

People v. Van Schoyck

... The State maintains that defendant's speedy-trial demand pertained only to the misdemeanor charges and not to the subsequent felony charge. ... The statute designates a violation of any of the above as a Class A misdemeanor. ...

People v. Lucas

... predicate felony for a charge of armed violence. He argued that the enhancement of driving while license revoked from a misdemeanor to a felony was intended for sentencing purposes only. The appellate court relied on the plain ...

People v. Bilelegne

... Defendant, Sisay Bilelegne, was charged with two misdemeanor counts of domestic battery to YW, an 11-year-old family member, in that "he struck him in the left shin with a baseball bat, struck him in the left knee with a hammer, and whipped him with an electric cord" on March ...