Ann Arbor Family Law Lawyer, Michigan

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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Anthony  Greene Lawyer

Anthony Greene

VERIFIED
Family Law, Bankruptcy, Criminal, Personal Injury
We help individuals, families and small businesses withtheir legal needs

Anthony Greene is a lifelong resident of the great State of Michigan and the owner of the Greene Law Group, PLC, law firm. He received his Bachelor of... (more)

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800-925-7280

Symantha L. Heath Lawyer

Symantha L. Heath

VERIFIED
Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Collaborative Law
Specialist in Divorce & Family Law

Susan Elkouri and Symantha Heath practice exclusively in the areas of divorce, family, and matrimonial law. They have developed a reputation not only ... (more)

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248-344-9700

Lana Panagoulia

Litigation, Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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James W. Fraser

Construction, Employment, Family Law, Labor Law
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Paul C. Fessler

Business Organization, Employment, Family Law, Labor Law
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Elizabeth A. Kitchen

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Misdemeanor
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Melanie C. Klark

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Collaborative Law, Criminal
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Rebecca Tooman

Dispute Resolution, Collaborative Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Travis M. Reeds

Family Law, Child Support, Medical Malpractice, Animal Bite
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michael W. Reeds

Land Use & Zoning, Estate Planning, Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

MINOR

In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in ... (more...)
In most states, any person under 18 years of age. All minors must be under the care of a competent adult (parent or guardian) unless they are 'emancipated'--in the military, married or living independently with court permission. Property left to a minor must be handled by an adult until the minor becomes an adult under the laws of the state where he or she lives.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

MISUNDERSTANDING

A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the... (more...)
A mistake by both spouses in a marriage that can serve as grounds for an annulment. For example, if one spouse went into the marriage wanting children while the other did not, they have a misunderstanding that will be judged serious enough for a court to terminate the marriage.

MISREPRESENTATION

A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapabl... (more...)
A lie by one spouse before marriage that provides grounds for an annulment. For example, if a spouse failed to mention that he was still married or was incapable of having children, he has misrepresented himself.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Johnson Family Ltd. Partnership v. White Pine Wireless, LLC

... At the time, the Johnson Family Trust (the Trust) served as the general partner for the Partnership. ... 480, 482, 722 NW2d 906 (2006). Whether a grant of equitable relief is proper under a given set of facts is a question of law that this Court also reviews de novo. ...

Estes v. Titus

... Toth), Kalamazoo, for Julie L. Swabash. Speaker Law Firm, PLLC (by Liisa R. Speaker and Jodi M. Latuszek), Lansing, for amici curiae the Family Law Section of the State Bar of Michigan. Howard & Howard Attorneys, PC (by ...

Sinicropi v. Mazurek

... 232, 241, 86 NW2d 336 (1957). Here, the trial court drew on virtually all the traditional equitable principles applicable in family-law cases: the best interest of the child, the fitness of the competing parents, and the past relationships of the parties. ...