Attleboro DUI-DWI Lawyer, Massachusetts


Michael  Delsignore Lawyer

Michael Delsignore

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime

Michael Delsignore is a practicing lawyer in the state of Massachusetts, who focuses on criminal law. He has tried cases in the areas of OUI.... (more)

Samuel P. Reef Lawyer

Samuel P. Reef

VERIFIED
Conveyancing, Car Accident, Bankruptcy, Divorce, DUI-DWI

Samuel Reef is a practicing lawyer in the state of Massachusetts. He received his J.D. from Suffolk University Law School in 1994. He currently works ... (more)

Scott D. Bradley

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Paul Michael Sahady

Complex Litigation, Federal Trial Practice, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Edward Russell Molari

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Contract, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

James M. Caramanica

Criminal, Felony, US Courts, DUI-DWI, Wrongful Death
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

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Susan Frances Damiano

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Lynn Lorraine Porreca

Juvenile Law, Immigration, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Eliot Brais

Insurance, DUI-DWI, Estate Planning, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Daniel J. Wood

Employee Rights, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  24 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

MENS REA

The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental s... (more...)
The mental component of criminal liability. To be guilty of most crimes, a defendant must have committed the criminal act (the actus reus) in a certain mental state (the mens rea). The mens rea of robbery, for example, is the intent to permanently deprive the owner of his property.

SELF-INCRIMINATION

The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the go... (more...)
The making of statements that might expose you to criminal prosecution, either now or in the future. The 5th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution prohibits the government from forcing you to provide evidence (as in answering questions) that would or might lead to your prosecution for a crime.

VENIREMEN

People who are summoned to the courthouse so that they may be questioned and perhaps chosen as jurors in trials of civil or criminal cases.

EXPUNGE

To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the crimi... (more...)
To intentionally destroy, obliterate or strike out records or information in files, computers and other depositories. For example, state law may allow the criminal records of a juvenile offender to be expunged when he reaches the age of majority, to allow him to begin his adult life with a clean record. Or, a company or government agency may routinely expunge out-of-date records to save storage space.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

CRIMINAL INSANITY

A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right... (more...)
A mental defect or disease that makes it impossible for a person to understand the wrongfulness of his acts or, even if he understands them, to ditinguish right from wrong. Defendants who are criminally insane cannot be convicted of a crime, since criminal conduct involves the conscious intent to do wrong -- a choice that the criminally insane cannot meaningfully make. See also irresistible impulse; McNaghten Rule.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

BRESTEN v. BOARD OF APPEAL ON MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY POLICIES & BONDS

... "Prior to the numerous amendments [that resulted in the statutory scheme], [driving under the influence] DUI had been interpreted as an impairment to the `slightest degree' by the consumption of alcoholic liquor." Thompson v. Colorado, 181 Colo. ...

BRESTEN v. BOARD OF APPEAL ON MOTOR VEHICLE LIABILITY POLICIES AND BONDS

... "Prior to the numerous amendments [that resulted in the statutory scheme], DUI [(or driving under the influence)] had been interpreted as an impairment to the `slightest degree' by the consumption of alcoholic liquor." Thompson v. Colorado, 181 Colo. ...

Commonwealth v. Putnam

... the police. The defendant became afraid; he recently had been involved in two "DUI" (driving under the influence) cases and had been warned that if he was convicted of a third offense he would go to jail for six months. 476 ...