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Austin DUI-DWI Lawyer, Texas


Diana Elizabeth Buss Lawyer

Diana Elizabeth Buss

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic
Criminal Defense Attorney serving clients in Travis, Hays, Williamson, Caldwell, Bastrop counties

The Law Office of Diana E. Buss is dedicated to providing excellent representation you need to defend against criminal charges. At my office, I treat ... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-695-1530

Russell David Hunt Lawyer

Russell David Hunt

VERIFIED
Criminal, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor
Board Certified Criminal Defense Throughout Central Texas

I am a board certified criminal defense attorney, practicing in the Central Texas area (Williamson, Travis and surrounding counties). I have an activ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-953-0441

Edwin Gerald Morris

Antitrust, Constitutional Law, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

Todd Nickle

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal, Felony, Grand Jury Proceedings
Status:  In Good Standing           

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William M Hines

Computer Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Domain Names, Electronic Commerce
Status:  In Good Standing           

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R. Marc Ranc

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal, Felony, Grand Jury Proceedings
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Ira L. Davis

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal Appellate Practice, Juvenile Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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Christopher W Holub

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Grand Jury Proceedings, Juvenile Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Jason Lee Partney

Estate Planning, DUI-DWI, Real Estate, Wills, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Michelle M. Galaviz

Constitutional Law, Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

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800-923-0641

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LEGAL TERMS

LEGISLATIVE IMMUNITY

A legal doctrine that prevents legislators from being sued for actions performed and decisions made in the course of serving in government. This doctrine does n... (more...)
A legal doctrine that prevents legislators from being sued for actions performed and decisions made in the course of serving in government. This doctrine does not protect legislators from criminal prosecution, nor does it relieve them from responsibility for actions outside the scope of their office, such as the nefarious activities of former Senator Bob Packwood.

MCNAGHTEN RULE

The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wron... (more...)
The earliest and most common test for criminal insanity, in which a criminal defendant is judged legally insane only if he could not distinguish right from wrong at the time he committed the crime. For example, a delusional psychotic who believed that his assaultive acts were in response to the will of God would not be criminally responsible for his acts.

JURY NULLIFICATION

A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for ... (more...)
A decision by the jury to acquit a defendant who has violated a law that the jury believes is unjust or wrong. Jury nullification has always been an option for juries in England and the United States, although judges will prevent a defense lawyer from urging the jury to acquit on this basis. Nullification was evident during the Vietnam war (when selective service protesters were acquitted by juries opposed to the war) and currently appears in criminal cases when the jury disagrees with the punishment--for example, in 'three strikes' cases when the jury realizes that conviction of a relatively minor offense will result in lifetime imprisonment.

HOMICIDE

The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncrim... (more...)
The killing of one human being by the act or omission of another. The term applies to all such killings, whether criminal or not. Homicide is considered noncriminal in a number of situations, including deaths as the result of war and putting someone to death by the valid sentence of a court. Killing may also be legally justified or excused, as it is in cases of self-defense or when someone is killed by another person who is attempting to prevent a violent felony. Criminal homicide occurs when a person purposely, knowingly, recklessly or negligently causes the death of another. Murder and manslaughter are both examples of criminal homicide.

PLEA

The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usual... (more...)
The defendant's formal answer to criminal charges. Typically defendants enter one of the following pleas: guilty, not guilty or nolo contendere. A plea is usually entered when charges are formally brought (at arraignment).

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

CHARGE

A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evid... (more...)
A formal accusation of criminal activity. The prosecuting attorney decides on the charges, after reviewing police reports, witness statements and any other evidence of wrongdoing. Formal charges are announced at an arrested person's arraignment.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Amador v. State

... We reverse. 874 The Controversy [1]. On June 24, 2003, an assistant district attorney in Montgomery County presented an information in the trial court charging appellant with misdemeanor driving while intoxicated (DWI). The ...

Peavey v. State

... At the penalty stage of the trial, appellant pleaded "true" to the three prior felony convictions alleged for the enhancement of punishment, including: a felony driving while intoxicated (DWI) conviction in 2003 in the same district court; convictions for possession of a controlled ...

Brown v. State

... Brown was placed in custody and charged with DWI-Misdemeanor Repetition. ... 2000). B. Applicable Law. Under Texas law, a person commits DWI "if the person is intoxicated while operating a motor vehicle in a public place." Tex. Penal Code Ann. § 49.04 (Vernon 2008). ...