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Forest D. Cook Lawyer

Forest D. Cook

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Litigation, Credit & Debt, Business & Trade, Real Estate

Following his passion for the law, attorney Forest Cook earned his Juris Doctor at the University of Houston Law Center in 1970. For over four decades... (more)

Andrew Jared Heilala Lawyer

Andrew Jared Heilala

VERIFIED
Personal Injury, Business & Trade, Family Law, Real Estate

The Law Office of Andrew Heilala helps clients in several areas of the law. If you are starting a business, we can answer your questions and advise yo... (more)

Novert  Morales Lawyer

Novert Morales

Criminal, Personal Injury, Family Law, Federal, DUI-DWI

In 1996, Attorney Novert Morales founded Morales Law Office, Attorneys at Law, PLLC., a private practice dedicated to representing individuals and fa... (more)

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512-474-2222

James W. Evans Lawyer

James W. Evans

VERIFIED
Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Adoption

After becoming licensed, Mr. Evans worked as an assistant criminal district attorney with the Tarrant County District Attorney’s Office and was lite... (more)

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Keith  Taniguchi Lawyer

Keith Taniguchi

VERIFIED
Litigation, Real Estate, Criminal, Family Law, Wills & Probate

Keith Taniguchi is a practicing attorney in the state of Texas. He received his J.D. from South Texas College of Law in 1984. He currently works for h... (more)

William D Powers Lawyer

William D Powers

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Prenuptial Agreements

Bill Powers is a highly regarded litigator and a seasoned counselor. His reputation as an Austin divorce attorney stems from a natural ability to rela... (more)

Kimberly G Kleinhans Lawyer

Kimberly G Kleinhans

VERIFIED
Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Slip & Fall Accident, Child Custody, Wrongful Death
Downtown and Bee Caves firms focusing on injury and family law.

Law Office of KG, PLLC is an Austin, Texas and Bee Cave, Texas law firm that focuses on personal injury such as auto collisions and family law such as... (more)

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CONTACT

800-905-9120

Sharon  Sanders Webster Lawyer

Sharon Sanders Webster

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Juvenile Law, Criminal

Sharon Sanders Webster has a varied legal background that spans over 30 years. She opened her law practice in downtown Taylor, Texas, in 1998. In Au... (more)

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CONTACT

800-913-2440

Kathryn Figueredo Fowler Lawyer

Kathryn Figueredo Fowler

VERIFIED
Divorce, Car Accident, Child Support, Mediation, Child Custody

The Law Office of Kathryn Figueredo Fowler also represents individuals with Personal Injury claims with the same tenacity as her Family Law litigation... (more)

William I. Jang

Immigration, Family Law, Criminal, Corporate
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LEGAL TERMS

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

JOINT CUSTODY

An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a... (more...)
An arrangement by which parents who do not live together share the upbringing of a child. Joint custody can be joint legal custody (in which both parents have a say in decisions affecting the child) joint physical custody (in which the child spends a significant amount of time with both parents) or, very rarely, both.

VISITATION RIGHTS

The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation... (more...)
The right to see a child regularly, typically awarded by the court to the parent who does not have physical custody of the child. The court will deny visitation rights only if it decides that visitation would hurt the child so much that the parent should be kept away.

HEARING

In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an... (more...)
In the trial court context, a legal proceeding (other than a full-scale trial) held before a judge. During a hearing, evidence and arguments are presented in an effort to resolve a disputed factual or legal issue. Hearings typically, but by no means always, occur prior to trial when a party asks the judge to decide a specific issue--often on an interim basis--such as whether a temporary restraining order or preliminary injunction should be issued, or temporary child custody or child support awarded. In the administrative or agency law context, a hearing is usually a proceeding before an administrative hearing officer or judge representing an agency that has the power to regulate a particular field or oversee a governmental benefit program. For example, the Federal Aviation Board (FAB) has the authority to hold hearings on airline safety, and a state Worker's Compensation Appeals Board has the power to rule on the appeals of people whose applications for benefits have been denied.

INCOMPATIBILITY

A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. C... (more...)
A conflict in personalities that makes married life together impossible. In a number of states, incompatibility is the accepted reason for a no-fault divorce. Compare irreconcilable differences; irremediable breakdown.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

GUARDIAN OF THE ESTATE

Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guar... (more...)
Someone appointed by a court to care for the property of a minor child that is not supervised by an adult under some other legal method, such as a trust. A guardian of the estate may also be called a 'property guardian' or 'financial guardian.' See also guardian.