Ask A Lawyer

Tell Us Your Case Information for Fastest Lawyer Match!

Please include all relevant details from your case including where, when, and who it involoves.
Case details that can effectively describe the legal situation while also staying concise generally receive the best responses from lawyers.


By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

Boston Adoption Lawyer, Massachusetts

Sponsored Law Firm


Joanne L. Goulka

Adoption, Affirmative Action, Age Discrimination, Alcoholic Beverages, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           

Anne Marie Corraro

Adoption, Animal Bite, Condominiums, Consumer Bankruptcy, Consumer Protection
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ellen A. Shapiro

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights, Commercial Leasing
Status:  In Good Standing           

Justin G. Maiona

Adoption, Divorce, Employment Discrimination, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

James Bacik

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Farms, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Wayne V. Gilbert

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Corporate, Child Support, Collaborative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Susan Castleton Ryan

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           

Karl G. Spitzer

Administrative Law, Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Arbitration
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Peter J. Arvanites

Administrative Law, Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Arbitration
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

John A. Christopher

Administrative Law, Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Dispute Resolution, Arbitration
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-923-0641

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.


Display Sponsorship

TIPS

Easily find Boston Adoption Lawyers and Boston Adoption Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

PREMARITAL AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometim... (more...)
An agreement made by a couple before marriage that controls certain aspects of their relationship, usually the management and ownership of property, and sometimes whether alimony will be paid if the couple later divorces. Courts usually honor premarital agreements unless one person shows that the agreement was likely to promote divorce, was written with the intention of divorcing or was entered into unfairly. A premarital agreement may also be known as a 'prenuptial agreement.'

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

SHARED CUSTODY

See joint custody.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

BEST INTERESTS (OF THE CHILD)

The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best inter... (more...)
The test that courts use when deciding who will take care of a child. For instance, an adoption is allowed only when a court declares it to be in the best interests of the child. Similarly, when asked to decide on custody issues in a divorce case, the judge will base his or her decision on the child's best interests. And the same test is used when judges decide whether a child should be removed from a parent's home because of neglect or abuse. Factors considered by the court in deciding the best interests of a child include: age and sex of the child mental and physical health of the child mental and physical health of the parents lifestyle and other social factors of the parents emotional ties between the parents and the child ability of the parents to provide the child with food, shelter, clothing and medical care established living pattern for the child concerning school, home, community and religious institution quality of schooling, and the child's preference.

AGE OF MAJORITY

Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in ... (more...)
Adulthood in the eyes of the law. After reaching the age of majority, a person is permitted to vote, make a valid will, enter into binding contracts, enlist in the armed forces and purchase alcohol. Also, parents may stop making child support payments when a child reaches the age of majority. In most states the age of majority is 18, but this varies depending on the activity. For example, in some states people are allowed to vote when they reach the age of eighteen, but can't purchase alcohol until they're 21.

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

ADOPTION OF ZEV.

"Parents have a fundamental liberty interest in maintaining a relationship with their children." Care & Protection of Erin, 443 Mass. 567, 570 (2005). Adoption of Edmund, 50 Mass.App.Ct. 526, 529 (2000). State action terminating a parent-child relationship must comport with ...

Adoption of Rico

Present: MARSHALL, CJ, IRELAND, SPINA, COWIN, CORDY, BOTSFORD, & GANTS, JJ. ... Annapurna Balakrishna, Assistant Attorney General, for Department of Children and Families. ... Andrew L. Cohen, Committee for Public Counsel Services, for Committee for ...

Adoption of Daisy

Background. [3] The department's involvement with Daisy and her family began on November 2, 2006, when Daisy, then nine years old, informed a school counsellor that her father routinely sexually abused her. The same day, Daisy was transported to the hospital for a pediatric ...