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Cory James Missell Lawyer

Cory James Missell

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DUI-DWI, Family Law, Criminal, Divorce & Family Law

Cory Missell was born and raised in Western New York. He has lived in the Rochester, Finger Lakes and Buffalo Areas. He is a graduate of Hobart Col... (more)

Ann  Giardina Hess Lawyer

Ann Giardina Hess

VERIFIED
Divorce, Divorce & Family Law, Mediation, Collaborative Law, Custody & Visitation

With Ann Giardina Hess, you can be confident that you are being represented by a child custody and divorce attorney that will protect your rights and ... (more)

Donna L. Haslinger

Estate Planning, Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Slip & Fall Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jerry A. Gambino

Estate Planning, Labor Law, Employment, Family Law, Personal Injury
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William J Kita

Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance, Litigation
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James P Burgio

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Hilary C. Banker

Litigation, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Linda M. Dipasquale

Family Law, Divorce, Child Support, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Steven P. Curvin

Construction, Estate Planning, Family Law, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas J. Grillo

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Construction, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

SPLIT CUSTODY

A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. ... (more...)
A custody arrangement in the case of multiple children, awarding sole custody of one child to one parent and sole custody of another child to the other parent. This arrangement is generally disfavored by judges because they are reluctant to split up siblings.

MARITAL SETTLEMENT AGREEMENT

See divorce agreement.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Chowdhury v. Rodriguez

... II. Labor Law § 240 (1) and § 241 (6). Labor Law § 240 (1) and § 241 (6) contain identical language exempting from the statutes "owners of one and two-family dwellings who contract for but do not direct or control the work" (compare Labor Law § 240 [1] with § 241 [6]). ...

MATTER OF SPENCER v. Spencer

... Under New York's version of UIFSA, "[a] tribunal of this state may not modify any aspect of a child support order that may not be modified under the law of the issuing state" (Family Ct Act § 580-611 [c]). In Connecticut, a court may issue an order of support for a child who is under ...

Ortega v. Puccia

... The defendants argued that summary judgment was appropriate under the single-family homeowners' exemption of Labor Law §§ 240 and 241. ... Unlike Labor Law §§ 240 and 241, section 200 does not contain any single- and two-family homeowners' exemption. ...