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Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Miriam E. Zakarin Lawyer

Miriam E. Zakarin

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Mediation

Organized and operated as a single, integrated partnership our partners have diverse backgrounds who are admitted to practice in New York and New Jers... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-906-8820

Ann L. Detiere Lawyer

Ann L. Detiere

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Family Law

Ms. Detiere's law practice, in New York City since 1990 began with a high profile case representing a client against a movie director for child suppor... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-725-4130

Fred Lewis Pollack Lawyer

Fred Lewis Pollack

VERIFIED
Real Estate, Landlord-Tenant, Commercial Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law

Fred L. Pollack, Esq. has been representing clients in family law matters (divorce, separation, custody and visitation) for 29 years. He is an experie... (more)

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Jonathan E. Edwards Lawyer

Jonathan E. Edwards

VERIFIED
Litigation, Family Law, Divorce, Juvenile Law, Divorce & Family Law

Our talented team at Edwards & Rockmore P.C. is committed to providing families with the caring and knowledgeable legal services they need to effectiv... (more)

Amy  Sklar Lawyer

Amy Sklar

VERIFIED
Family Law, Real Estate, Divorce
Heampstead Family Lawyer

Amy Sklar has practiced with several well-respected law firms and independently on Long Island. She has over 30 years of legal experience focusing on... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-881-7201

Darren  Deurso Lawyer

Darren Deurso

VERIFIED
Car Accident, Family Law, DUI-DWI, Felony, Traffic
Dedicated, Devoted, Determined

Darren DeUrso has been in practice for 25 years, including years as an assistant district attorney for Westchester County and in the private practice ... (more)

David  Bliven Lawyer

David Bliven

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Juvenile Law, Child Custody, Family Law, Child Support
Former Family Court Prosecutor

Attorney David Bliven graduated with honors from Syracuse University in 1993 with a B.A. in Sociology. He went on to serve as a judicial intern and s... (more)

Adam  Peretz Lawyer

Adam Peretz

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support, Family Law

Peretz Family Law & Mediation, P.C. is a Nassau County divorce and family law litigation and mediation firm with offices in New York City, Plainview i... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-993-2870

Lance D. Simon Lawyer

Lance D. Simon

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Child Custody, Business, Family Law

Simon Law Group specializes in resolving family, divorce, discrimination, and business issues and disputes throughout Long Island and New York City. ... (more)

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CONTACT

631-228-7686

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMUNITY PROPERTY

A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings ar... (more...)
A method for defining the ownership of property acquired during marriage, in which all earnings during marriage and all property acquired with those earnings are considered community property and all debts incurred during marriage are community property debts. Community property laws exist in Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Compare equitable distribution and separate property.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Chowdhury v. Rodriguez

... II. Labor Law § 240 (1) and § 241 (6). Labor Law § 240 (1) and § 241 (6) contain identical language exempting from the statutes "owners of one and two-family dwellings who contract for but do not direct or control the work" (compare Labor Law § 240 [1] with § 241 [6]). ...

MATTER OF SPENCER v. Spencer

... Under New York's version of UIFSA, "[a] tribunal of this state may not modify any aspect of a child support order that may not be modified under the law of the issuing state" (Family Ct Act § 580-611 [c]). In Connecticut, a court may issue an order of support for a child who is under ...

Ortega v. Puccia

... The defendants argued that summary judgment was appropriate under the single-family homeowners' exemption of Labor Law §§ 240 and 241. ... Unlike Labor Law §§ 240 and 241, section 200 does not contain any single- and two-family homeowners' exemption. ...