Bumpass Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, Virginia


Aubrey Hampton Brown III Lawyer

Aubrey Hampton Brown III

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Real Estate, Residential Real Estate, Divorce, Car Accident

Aubrey Brown is a member of the firm’s litigation section, and was named a shareholder in 2018. His practice crosses multiple areas of law, consist... (more)

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804-262-3600

Stephen  Bryant Lawyer

Stephen Bryant

VERIFIED
Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law

Steve Bryant is a member of the firm’s litigation section. Steve defends clients charged with serious traffic offenses including DUIs; he was recen... (more)

Pamela  Herrington Lawyer

Pamela Herrington

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Custody & Visitation, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support, Adoption

Pamela Herrington is a native Richmonder specializing in family law and has extensive trial experience throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia. Much o... (more)

Dimitrios  Karles Lawyer

Dimitrios Karles

VERIFIED
Business, Landlord-Tenant, Residential Real Estate, Divorce & Family Law, Collection

Dimitrios Karles is a member of the firm’s business, litigation, and real estate section. As a litigator, he regularly represents individual and cor... (more)

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Hugh Sheppard Campbell

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Transportation & Shipping
Status:  In Good Standing           

Aimee S. Clanton

Farms, Family Law, Divorce, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

John Paul Gregorio

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Adoption, Children's Rights, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Anthony Paone

Eminent Domain, Family Law, Business Organization, Collection
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Harris W. Leiner

Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation, Real Estate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Hugh Sheppard Campbell

Family Law, Medical Malpractice, Wills & Probate, Transportation & Shipping
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

CHILD SUPPORT

The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by e... (more...)
The entitlement of all children to be supported by their parents until the children reach the age of majority or become emancipated -- usually by marriage, by entry into the armed forces or by living independently. Many states also impose child support obligations on parents for a year or two beyond this point if the child is a full-time student. If the parents are living separately, they each must still support the children. Typically, the parent who has custody meets his or her support obligation through taking care of the child every day, while the other parent must make payments to the custodial parent on behalf of the child -- usually cash but sometimes other kinds of contributions. When parents divorce, the court almost always orders the non-custodial parent to pay the custodial parent an amount of child support fixed by state law. Sometimes, however, if the parents share physical custody more or less equally, the court will order the higher-income parent to make payments to the lower-income parent.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

CASE

A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appe... (more...)
A term that most often refers to a lawsuit -- for example, 'I filed my small claims case.' 'Case' also refers to a written decision by a judge -- or for an appellate case, a panel of judges. For example, the U.S. Supreme Court's decision legalizing abortion is commonly referred to as the Roe v. Wade case. Finally, the term also describes the evidence a party submits in support of her position -- for example, 'I have made my case' or ''My case-in-chief' has been completed.'

CUSTODY (OF A CHILD)

The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When ... (more...)
The legal authority to make decisions affecting a child's interests (legal custody) and the responsibility of taking care of the child (physical custody). When parents separate or divorce, one of the hardest decisions they have to make is which parent will have custody. The most common arrangement is for one parent to have custody (both physical and legal) while the other parent has a right of visitation. But it is not uncommon for the parents to share legal custody, even though one parent has physical custody. The most uncommon arrangement is for the parents to share both legal and physical custody.

GIFT TAXES

Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form... (more...)
Federal taxes assessed on any gift, or combination of gifts, from one person to another that exceeds $12,000 in one year. Several kinds of gifts are exempt form this tax: gifts to tax-exempt charities, gifts to your spouse (limited to $120,000 annually if the recipient isn't a U.S. citizen) and gifts made for tuition or medical bills. In addition to the annual gift tax exclusion, there is a $1 million cumulative tax exemption for gifts. In other words, you can give away a total of $1 million during your lifetime -- over and above the gifts you give using the annual exclusion -- without paying gift taxes.