Cedar Rapids Trusts Lawyer, Iowa


Robert J. O'Shea

Tax, Real Estate, Business & Trade, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Byron G. Riley

Tax, Wills, Trusts, Corporate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  63 Years

Forrest W. Rosser

Real Estate, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  65 Years

Jase Henry Jensen

Real Estate, Trusts, Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  8 Years
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Allan L. Harms

International Intellectual Property, Trusts, Business & Trade
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

H. Edward Beatty

Real Estate, Estate Administration, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  59 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

CURATOR

See conservator.

GRANT DEED

A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as descri... (more...)
A deed containing an implied promise that the person transfering the property actually owns the title and that it is not encumbered in any way, except as described in the deed. This is the most commonly used type of deed. Compare quitclaim deed.

FAMILY ALLOWANCE

A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to ... (more...)
A certain amount of a deceased person's money to which immediate family members are entitled at the beginning of the probate process. The allowance is meant to help support the surviving spouse and children during the time it takes to probate the estate. The amount is determined by state law and varies greatly from state to state.

PUBLISHED WORK

An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public o... (more...)
An original work of authorship that is considered published for purposes of copyright law. A work is 'published' when it is first made available to the public on an unrestricted basis. It is thus possible to display a work, or distribute it with restrictions on disclosure of its contents, without actually 'publishing' it. Both published and unpublished works are entitled to copyright protection, but some of the rules differ.

DEVISEE

A person or entity who inherits real estate under the terms of a will.

INTESTATE SUCCESSION

The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest s... (more...)
The method by which property is distributed when a person dies without a valid will. Each state's law provides that the property be distributed to the closest surviving relatives. In most states, the surviving spouse, children, parents, siblings, nieces and nephews, and next of kin inherit, in that order.

LIVING TRUST

A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the t... (more...)
A trust you can set up during your life. Living trusts are an excellent way to avoid the cost and hassle of probate because the property you transfer into the trust during your life passes directly to the trust beneficiaries after you die, without court involvement. The successor trustee--the person you appoint to handle the trust after your death--simply transfers ownership to the beneficiaries you named in the trust. Living trusts are also called 'inter vivos trusts.'

CERTIFICATION OF TRUST

See abstract of trust.

PROPERTY CONTROL TRUST

Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who ha... (more...)
Any trust that imposes limits or controls over the rights of trust beneficiaries. These trusts include (1) special needs trusts designed to assist people who have special physical, emotional or other requirements, (2) spendthrift trusts designed to prevent a beneficiary from wasting the trust principal; and (3) sprinkling trusts that allow the trustee to decide how to distribute trust income or principal among the beneficiaries.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re Estate of Gist

... death, to the extent of such interests, including but not limited to interests in jointly held property, retained life estates, and interests in trusts." Id. ... In Barkema, we identified the two classifications of support trusts, a pure support trust and a discretionary support trust. Id. at 53-54. ...

IN THE MATTER OF ESTATE OF McDOWELL

... Jur. 2d Wills § 196, at 403 (2002). Such a provision is authorized under Iowa and Oregon statutes, [2] both adapted from the Uniform Testamentary Additions to Trusts Act (1960) ("UTATA"). ... 1 Austin W. Scott et al., Scott and Ascher on Trusts § 7.1.3, at 352 (Aspen 5th ed. 2006). ...

IN RE MATTER OF TRUST UNDER THE LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF WEITZEL

... Bass, 196 NW2d at 435; see also In re Woltersdorf, 255 Iowa 914, 916, 124 NW2d 510, 511 (1963) ("The matter of fees for executors and trustees rests within the sound discretion of the trial court."); Restatement (Third) of Trusts § 38 cmt. ...