Cheyenne Estate Lawyer, Wyoming


Howard V. Scotland

Real Estate, Wills & Probate, Estate Planning, Divestitures
Status:  Inactive           

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Paul J. Hickey

Education, Litigation, Estate Planning, Employment
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  46 Years

John M. Walker

Litigation, Lawsuit & Dispute, Municipal, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Carl L. Lathrop

Litigation, Estate Planning, Corporate, Professional Malpractice
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  68 Years
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Michael J. McGrady

Corporate, Estate Planning, Family Law, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  15 Years

Rhonda Sigrist Woodard

Family Law, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  41 Years

Heather Nicole Jarvis

Lawsuit & Dispute, Estate, Business, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  6 Years

Dean W. Borthwick

Civil & Human Rights, Municipal, Corporate, Wills & Probate
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  64 Years

Brian Claude Shuck

Natural Resources, Estate, Personal Injury, Construction
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Tara Brooke Nethercott

Construction, Trusts, Elder Law, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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LEGAL TERMS

HEIR AT LAW

A person entitled to inherit property under intestate succession laws.

TITLE COMPANY

A company that issues title insurance.

PROBATE

The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased pers... (more...)
The court process following a person's death that includes proving the authenticity of the deceased person's will appointing someone to handle the deceased person's affairs identifying and inventorying the deceased person's property paying debts and taxes identifying heirs, and distributing the deceased person's property according to the will or, if there is no will, according to state law. Formal court-supervised probate is a costly, time-consuming process -- a windfall for lawyers -- which is best avoided if possible.

TAKING AGAINST THE WILL

A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property.... (more...)
A procedure under state law that gives a surviving spouse the right to demand a certain share (usually one-third to one-half) of the deceased spouse's property. The surviving spouse can take that share instead of accepting whatever he or she inherited through the deceased spouse's will. If the surviving spouse decides to take the statutory share, it's called 'taking against the will.' Dower and curtesy is another name for the same legal process.

SUCCESSION

The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which d... (more...)
The passing of property or legal rights after death. The word commonly refers to the distribution of property under a state's intestate succession laws, which determine who inherits property when someone dies without a valid will. When used in connection with real estate, the word refers to the passing of property by will or inheritance, as opposed to gift, grant, or purchase.

ESTATE TAXES

Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and... (more...)
Taxes imposed by the state or federal government on property as it passes from the dead to the living. All property you own, whatever the form of ownership, and whether or not it goes through probate after your death, is subject to federal estate tax. Currently, however, federal estate tax is due only if your property is worth at least $2 million when you die. The estate tax is scheduled to be repealed for one year, in 2010, but Congress will probably make the repeal (or a very high exempt amount) permanent. Any property left to a surviving spouse (if he or she is a U.S. citizen) or a tax-exempt charity is exempt from federal estate taxes. Many states now also impose their own estate taxes or inheritance taxes.

GENERATION-SKIPPING TRUST

A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income fro... (more...)
A trust designed to save on estate tax. The trust principal is preserved for the trust maker's grandchildren, with his or her children receiving only income from the trust. Because the children (the middle generation) never legally own the property, it isn't subject to estate tax at their death. See generation-skipping transfer tax.

SURVIVING SPOUSE'S TRUST

If a couple has created an AB trust, the revocable living trust (Trust B) of the surviving spouse, after the first spouse has died.

SPENDTHRIFT TRUST

A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the benefi... (more...)
A trust created for a beneficiary the grantor considers irresponsible about money. The trustee keeps control of the trust income, doling out money to the beneficiary as needed, and sometimes paying third parties (creditors, for example) on the beneficiary's behalf, bypassing the beneficiary completely. Spendthrift trusts typically contain a provision prohibiting creditors from seizing the trust fund to satisfy the beneficiary's debts. These trusts are legal in most states, even though creditors hate them.