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C. Edward Noe

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Bankruptcy & Debt, Credit & Debt, Collection

I am the principal of the firm and handle all business and affairs of the firm and handle all of our litigation and business files. I have been practi... (more)

Patrick J. Conway

Foreclosure, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy, Bankruptcy & Debt
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Michael Allen Brown

Land Use & Zoning, Contract, Credit & Debt, Landlord-Tenant
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Russ B. Cope

Real Estate, Criminal, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
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Rick West

Bankruptcy & Debt, Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt

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Kimberly V. Thomas

Divorce & Family Law, Business & Trade, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy
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Bruce Kelly Gilster

Bankruptcy & Debt, Commercial Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt, Power of Attorney
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Michael Smith

Bankruptcy & Debt, Bankruptcy, Collection, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           

Joel T. Hardman

Public Finance, Business & Trade, Banking & Finance, Credit & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  23 Years

Thomas Michael Glennon

Landlord-Tenant, Credit & Debt, Bankruptcy & Debt
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  21 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

CREDIT INSURANCE

Insurance a lender requires a borrower to purchase to cover the loan. If the borrower dies or becomes disabled before paying off the loan, the policy will pay o... (more...)
Insurance a lender requires a borrower to purchase to cover the loan. If the borrower dies or becomes disabled before paying off the loan, the policy will pay off the remaining balance. Federal and state consumer protection laws require the lender to disclose to existing and potential borrowers the terms and costs of obtaining credit insurance because it can affect the terms of the loan.

FRATERNAL BENEFIT SOCIETY BENEFITS

These are benefits, often group life insurance, paid for by fraternal societies to their members. Elks, Masons or Knights of Columbus are common fraternal socie... (more...)
These are benefits, often group life insurance, paid for by fraternal societies to their members. Elks, Masons or Knights of Columbus are common fraternal societies that provide benefits. Also called benefit society, benevolent society or mutual aid association benefits. Under bankruptcy laws, these benefits are virtually always considered exempt property.

FCRA

See Fair Credit Reporting Act.

NONPROFIT CORPORATION

A legal structure authorized by state law allowing people to come together to either benefit members of an organization (a club, or mutual benefit society) or f... (more...)
A legal structure authorized by state law allowing people to come together to either benefit members of an organization (a club, or mutual benefit society) or for some public purpose (such as a hospital, environmental organization or literary society). Nonprofit corporations, despite the name, can make a profit, but the business cannot be designed primarily for profit-making purposes, and the profits must be used for the benefit of the organization or purpose the corporation was created to help. When a nonprofit corporation dissolves, any remaining assets must be distributed to another nonprofit, not to board members. As with for-profit corporations, directors of nonprofit corporations are normally shielded from personal liability for the organization's debts. Some nonprofit corporations qualify for a federal tax exemption under _ 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, with the result that contributions to the nonprofit are tax deductible by their donors.

HOUSEHOLDER

A person who supports and maintains a household, with or without other people. In bankruptcy law, a householder, housekeeper or head of household can claim a ho... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains a household, with or without other people. In bankruptcy law, a householder, housekeeper or head of household can claim a homestead exemption and possibly other exemptions relating to the maintenance of the household.

C CORPORATION

Common business slang to distinguish a corporation whose profits are taxed separate from its owners under subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code, from an S c... (more...)
Common business slang to distinguish a corporation whose profits are taxed separate from its owners under subchapter C of the Internal Revenue Code, from an S corporation, whose profits are passed through to shareholders and taxed on their personal returns under subchapter S of the Internal Revenue Code.

SUBROGATION

A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off i... (more...)
A taking on of the legal rights of someone whose debts or expenses have been paid. For example, subrogation occurs when an insurance company that has paid off its injured claimant takes the legal rights the claimant has against a third party that caused the injury, and sues that third party.

REAFFIRMATION

An agreement that a debtor and a creditor enter into after a debtor has filed for bankruptcy, in which the debtor agrees to repay all or part of an existing deb... (more...)
An agreement that a debtor and a creditor enter into after a debtor has filed for bankruptcy, in which the debtor agrees to repay all or part of an existing debt after the bankruptcy case is over. For instance, a debtor might make a reaffirmation agreement with the holder of a car note that the debtor can keep the car and must continue to pay the debt after bankruptcy.

PREFERENCE

A payment made by a debtor to a creditor within a defined period prior to filing for bankruptcy -- within three months for arms-length creditors (regular commer... (more...)
A payment made by a debtor to a creditor within a defined period prior to filing for bankruptcy -- within three months for arms-length creditors (regular commercial creditors) and within one year for insider creditors (friends, family members, and business associates). Because a preference gives the creditor who received the payment an edge over other creditors in the bankruptcy case, the trustee can recover the preference (the amount of the payment) and distribute it among all of the creditors.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Ford v. Ford Motor Credit Co.

... The result was that the account was returned to collections. Subsequently, Ford received letters from collections agencies and repeated phone 85 calls from those agencies, and the "bad debt" was placed on his credit report by FMCC. ...

Ham v. Ham

... Neither party filed objections to the magistrate's decision. On December 15, 2006, the magistrate sua sponte filed a Nunc Pro Tunc magistrate's decision to correct a mathematical error in the calculation of Daniel's credit card debt. ...

Home Depot USA, Inc. v. Levin

... Under the statute, the latter qualify for the bad-debt deduction. {¶ 19} This argument fails because vendors who extend credit themselves are not, with respect to bad debt, similarly situated to vendors like Home Depot, who hire financial institutions to extend credit. ...