Dallas Misdemeanor Lawyer, Texas

Sponsored Law Firm


Darlina  Crowder Lawyer

Darlina Crowder

Criminal, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Attorney Darlina C. Crowder provides criminal defense representation for clients in the Plano, Texas area. She has been practicing law in the U.S. Dis... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

214-303-9600

Christina  Fox Lawyer

Christina Fox

VERIFIED
Misdemeanor, Car Accident, Divorce & Family Law, Bankruptcy, DUI-DWI

Christina Fox is the owner and managing attorney for the Law Office of Christina Fox, PLLC. She is a military veteran who has many years of work expe... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-608-4870

Tiffany  Strother Lawyer

Tiffany Strother

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Estate, Misdemeanor, Juvenile Law, Business Organization
Let our legal team assist you today! We proudly serve Johnson, Tarrant & Somervell counties.

Opening a firm together has been a dream of Tiffany's and DeeAnn from the time they entered law school. They wanted to have a firm that was built on t... (more)

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

800-745-6310

Paul Rothband

Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           
Speak with Lawyer.com

Caroline Simone

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Christopher N. Hoover

DUI-DWI, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

John Lawrence Corn

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Paul Saputo

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal

Kevin Blake Ross

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  18 Years

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Aaron Harper

Misdemeanor, Felony, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Dallas Misdemeanor Lawyers and Dallas Misdemeanor Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Criminal areas including DUI-DWI, Felony, RICO Act, White Collar Crime and Traffic attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

BOOKING

A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed beh... (more...)
A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed behind bars. Nowadays, the book is likely to be a computer. Usually, a mug shot and fingerprints are taken, and the arrestee's clothing and personal effects are inventoried and stored.

INSANITY

See criminal insanity.

OWN RECOGNIZANCE (OR)

A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recogni... (more...)
A way the defendant can get out of jail, without paying bail, by promising to appear in court when next required to be there. Sometimes called 'personal recognizance.' Only those with strong ties to the community, such as a steady job, local family and no history of failing to appear in court, are good candidates for 'OR' release. If the charge is very serious, however, OR may not be an option.

CIVIL

Noncriminal. See civil case.

ARREST

A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arre... (more...)
A situation in which the police detain a person in a manner that, to any reasonable person, makes it clear she is not free to leave. A person can be 'under arrest' even though the police have not announced it; nor are handcuffs or physical restraint necessary. Questioning an arrested person about her involvement in or knowledge of a crime must be preceded by the Miranda warnings if the police intend to use the answers against the person in a criminal case. If the arrested person chooses to remain silent, the questioning must stop.

CRIME

A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defin... (more...)
A type of behavior that is has been defined by the state, as deserving of punishment which usually includes imprisonment. Crimes and their punishments are defined by Congress and state legislatures.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

CAPITAL CASE

A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecuto... (more...)
A prosecution for murder in which the jury is also asked to decide if the defendant is guilty and, if he is, whether he should be put to death. When a prosecutor brings a capital case (also called a death penalty case), she must charge one or more 'special circumstances' that the jury must find to be true in order to sentence the defendant to death. Each state (and the federal government) has its own list of special circumstances, but common ones include multiple murders, use of a bomb or a finding that the murder was especially heinous, atrocious or cruel.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY (D.A.)

A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewi... (more...)
A lawyer who is elected to represent a state government in criminal cases in a designated county or judicial district. A D.A.'s duties typically include reviewing police arrest reports, deciding whether to bring criminal charges against arrested people and prosecuting criminal cases in court. The D.A. may also supervise other attorneys, called Deputy District Attorneys or Assistant District Attorneys. In some states a District Attorney may be called a Prosecuting Attorney, County Attorney or State's Attorney. In the federal system, the equivalent to the D.A. is a United States Attorney. The country has many U.S. Attorneys, each appointed by the President, who supervise regional offices staffed with prosecutors called Assistant United States Attorneys.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Kirkpatrick v. State

... presented its case-in-chief, appellant moved for an instructed verdict on the felony forgery count, asserting that the state had failed to prove felony forgery because it had not alleged or proven any of the elements necessary to make the forgery a felony rather than a misdemeanor ...

Edison v. State

... no authority to defer adjudication and extend his community supervision for two years; the court had no authority to revoke his community supervision because it had expired as a matter of law; he was denied due process because he was convicted of a misdemeanor offense but ...

Ex parte Harrington

... We hold that it is. In this case, applicant contends that habeas corpus lies because his plea was involuntary due to counsel's ineffectiveness in failing to investigate a prior DWI conviction used to enhance applicant's misdemeanor DWI charge to a felony charge. ...