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Gary Warren Sibley Lawyer

Gary Warren Sibley

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Corporate, Divorce & Family Law, Litigation, Wills & Probate, Insurance

Gary Sibley is a practicing attorney in the state of Texas. He graduated from Baylor Law School with his J.D. in 1973. He currently works for Sibley, ... (more)

Gregory Sinclair Beane Lawyer

Gregory Sinclair Beane

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Divorce, Child Custody, Alimony & Spousal Support, Collaborative Law, Prenuptial Agreements

Every family law matter, just like every person, is different. As such, Greg Beane provides each client with personalized attention throughout each s... (more)

Jeffrey Owen Anderson Lawyer

Jeffrey Owen Anderson

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Divorce & Family Law, Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support

Professional, yet approachable. Confident, yet easygoing. I will tenaciously represent you with honesty, integrity and empathy. I come from a family o... (more)

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Carin Paris Evans Lawyer

Carin Paris Evans

Personal Injury, International Other, Family Law
Charles H. Robertson Lawyer

Charles H. Robertson

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Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support

Charles Robertson earned his law degree from Southern Methodist University, is Board Certified in Family Law by the Texas Board of Legal Specializat... (more)

Julie E. Johnson Lawyer

Julie E. Johnson

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Accident & Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Car Accident, Wrongful Death, Personal Injury
Vehicle Accident, Personal Injury, Wrongful Death, Brain Injury, Back, Neck Bone and Joint Injuries

Dallas personal injury attorney Julie Johnson has handled thousands of cases since 1991. Her Dallas-based practice – the Law Office of Julie Johnson... (more)

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Robin Rubrecht Zegen Lawyer

Robin Rubrecht Zegen

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Divorce & Family Law

In life, nothing imparts knowledge better than experience. Having endured a high conflict divorce that ended her twenty-year marriage, Robin Rubrecht... (more)

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800-917-3931

Steven W. Bruneman Lawyer

Steven W. Bruneman

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Divorce & Family Law
My firm handles family law matters including divorce, child custody, child support, prenups

Steven Bruneman is an experienced attorney with both the knowledge and skills to serve clients in all types of Family Law cases. For large and more co... (more)

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LEGAL TERMS

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

CHILD

(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born o... (more...)
(1) A son or daughter of any age, sometimes including biological offspring, unborn children, adopted children, stepchildren, foster children and children born outside of marriage. (2) A person under an age specified by law, often 14 or 16. For example, state law may require a person to be over the age of 14 to make a valid will, or may define the crime of statutory rape as sex with a person under the age of 16. In this sense, a child can be distinguished from a minor, who is a person under the age of 18 in most states. A person below the specified legal age who is married is often considered an adult rather than a child. See also emancipation.

CUSTODIAN

A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manag... (more...)
A term used by the Uniform Transfers to Minors Act for the person named to manage property left to a child under the terms of that Act. The custodian will manage the property if the gift giver dies before the child has reached the age specified by state law -- usually 21. When the child reaches the specified age, he will receive the property and the custodian will have no further role in its management.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.