Durham Child Custody Lawyer, North Carolina


Includes: Guardianships & Conservatorships, Custody & Visitation

Martha  New Milam Lawyer

Martha New Milam

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Prenuptial Agreements, Alimony & Spousal Support, Custody & Visitation, Child Support

A native of Durham, North Carolina, Martha New Milam was born at Watts Hospital in Durham in 1956. She was educated in the Durham City and County publ... (more)

Ann M. Credle

Divorce, Child Support, Child Custody, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  28 Years

Susan R. Franklin

Prenuptial Agreements, Collaborative Law, Child Custody, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rose D. Mackritis

Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Child Support, Alimony & Spousal Support
Status:  In Good Standing           
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E. William Kratt

Estate, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Divorce & Family Law, Civil & Human Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Paula K. McGrann

Divorce & Family Law, Child Support, Custody & Visitation, Family Law, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

Rebecca Ashley Nelson

Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Custody, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Kevin P. Hopper

Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  27 Years

Arlene Colon

Divorce, Child Custody, Family Law, Accident & Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Laura Esseesse

Family Law, Alimony & Spousal Support, Divorce, Child Custody
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DILUTION

A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurr... (more...)
A situation in which a famous trademark or service mark is used in a context in which the mark's reputation for quality is tarnished or its distinction is blurred. In this case, trademark infringement exists even though there is no likelihood of customer confusion, which is usually required in cases of trademark infringement. For example, the use of the word Candyland for a pornographic site on the Internet was ruled to dilute the reputation of the Candyland mark for the well-known children's game, even though the traditional basis for trademark infringement (probable customer confusion) wasn't an issue.

MARRIAGE LICENSE

A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pa... (more...)
A document that authorizes a couple to get married, usually available from the county clerk's office in the state where the marriage will take place. Couples pay a small fee for a marriage license, and must often wait a few days before it is issued. In addition, a few states require a short waiting period--usually not more than a day--between the time the license is issued and the time the marriage may take place. And some states still require blood tests for couples before they will issue a marriage license, though most no longer do.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

AMICUS CURIAE

Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong i... (more...)
Latin for 'friend of the court.' This term describes a person or organization that is not a party to a lawsuit as plaintiff or defendant but that has a strong interest in the case and wants to get its two cents in. For example, the ACLU often submits materials to support a person who claims a violation of civil rights even though that person is represented by a lawyer.

FAMILY COURT

A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), ch... (more...)
A separate court, or more likely a separate division of the regular state trial court, that considers only cases involving divorce (dissolution of marriage), child custody and support, guardianship, adoption, and other cases having to do with family-related issues, including the issuance of restraining orders in domestic violence cases.

FMLA

See Family and Medical Leave Act.

IRREMEDIABLE OR IRRETRIEVABLE BREAKDOWN

The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremedia... (more...)
The situation that occurs in a marriage when one spouse refuses to live with the other and will not work toward reconciliation. In a number of states, irremediable breakdown is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into whether the marriage has actually broken down, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the marriage has fallen apart. Compare incompatibility; irreconcilable differences.

ADOPTION

A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship rec... (more...)
A court procedure by which an adult becomes the legal parent of someone who is not his or her biological child. Adoption creates a parent-child relationship recognized for all legal purposes -- including child support obligations, inheritance rights and custody.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Mason v. Dwinnell

... 50-13.1 to seek custody of a child from a natural parent." Id. ... [4]. We believe these circumstances are analogous to those in Price, in which the plaintiff, a man who had previously lived with the child's mother, sought custody. ...

Heatzig v. MacLean

... 340, 342, 540 SE2d 804, 806 (2000) ("[T]he findings and conclusions of the trial court must comport with [the] case law regarding child custody matters."); see also Concerned Citizens v. Holden Beach Enterprises, 329 NC 37, 54-55, 404 SE2d 677, 688 (1991) ("When the order ...

In re THT

... In re Montgomery, 311 NC 101, 109, 316 SE2d 246, 251 (1984) (emphasizing that "[t]he fundamental principle underlying North Carolina's approach to controversies involving child neglect and custody [is] that the best interest of the child is the polar star"); see also NCGS § 7B ...