Fayetteville Child Custody Lawyer, North Carolina

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Ashley Nicole McDuffie Lawyer

Ashley Nicole McDuffie

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Power of Attorney, Accident & Injury

Ashley McDuffie is a member of the NC Bar Association. She is also a North Carolina certified mediator. Attorney McDuffie is a member of the NC Young ... (more)

Ashley Nicole McDuffie Lawyer

Ashley Nicole McDuffie

VERIFIED
Criminal, Traffic, Guardianships & Conservatorships, Power of Attorney, Accident & Injury

Ashley McDuffie is a member of the NC Bar Association. She is also a North Carolina certified mediator. Attorney McDuffie is a member of the NC Young ... (more)

Jonathan D. Breeden Lawyer

Jonathan D. Breeden

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, Wills & Probate, Guardianships & Conservatorships

Jonathan Breeden is a successful family law lawyer in Garner, North Carolina. He graduated from NC State with a political science degree in just three... (more)

Patricia A. Wilson Ferguson

Divorce & Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Adoption
Status:  In Good Standing           
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Meleisa Rush Lane

Family Law, Divorce, Child Custody, Child Support
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  25 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

FOSTER CARE

Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents h... (more...)
Court-ordered care provided to children who are unable to live in their own homes, usually because their parents have abused or neglected them. Foster parents have a legal responsibility to care for their foster children, but do not have all the rights of a biological parent--for example, they may have limited rights to discipline the children, to raise them according to a certain religion or to authorize non-emergency medical procedures for them. The foster parents do not become the child's legal parents unless the biological parents' rights are terminated by a court and the foster parents adopt the child. This is not typically encouraged, as the goal of foster care is to provide temporary support for the children until they can be returned to their parents. See also foster child.

LEGAL RISK PLACEMENT

A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the bir... (more...)
A type of adoption used by agencies to keep a child out of foster care during the adoption process. The child is placed with the adopting parents before the birthmother has legally given up her rights to raise the child. If she then decides not to relinquish her rights, the adopting parents must give the child back. This is a risk for the adopting parents, who may lose a child to whom they've become attached.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

ANNULMENT

A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained ... (more...)
A court procedure that dissolves a marriage and treats it as if it never happened. Annulments are rare since the advent of no-fault divorce but may be obtained in most states for one of the following reasons: misrepresentation, concealment (for example, of an addiction or criminal record), misunderstanding and refusal to consummate the marriage.

PHYSICAL CUSTODY

The right and obligation of a parent to have his child live with him. Compare legal custody.

CONFIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION

Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information b... (more...)
Information exchanged between two people who (1) have a relationship in which private communications are protected by law, and (2) intend that the information be kept in confidence. The law recognizes certain parties whose communications will be considered confidential and protected, including spouses, doctor and patient, attorney and client, and priest and confessor. Communications between these individuals cannot be disclosed in court unless the protected party waives that protection. The intention that the communication be confidential is critical. For example, if an attorney and his client are discussing a matter in the presence of an unnecessary third party -- for example, in an elevator with other people present -- the discussion will not be considered confidential and may be admitted at trial. Also known as privileged communication.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

FOSTER CHILD

A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family ... (more...)
A child placed by a government agency or a court in the care of someone other than his or her natural parents. Foster children may be removed from their family home because of parental abuse or neglect. Occasionally, parents voluntarily place their children in foster care. See foster care.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Mason v. Dwinnell

... 50-13.1 to seek custody of a child from a natural parent." Id. ... [4]. We believe these circumstances are analogous to those in Price, in which the plaintiff, a man who had previously lived with the child's mother, sought custody. ...

Heatzig v. MacLean

... 340, 342, 540 SE2d 804, 806 (2000) ("[T]he findings and conclusions of the trial court must comport with [the] case law regarding child custody matters."); see also Concerned Citizens v. Holden Beach Enterprises, 329 NC 37, 54-55, 404 SE2d 677, 688 (1991) ("When the order ...

In re THT

... In re Montgomery, 311 NC 101, 109, 316 SE2d 246, 251 (1984) (emphasizing that "[t]he fundamental principle underlying North Carolina's approach to controversies involving child neglect and custody [is] that the best interest of the child is the polar star"); see also NCGS § 7B ...