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Durham DUI-DWI Lawyer, North Carolina


Kathy Williams Richardson Lawyer

Kathy Williams Richardson

VERIFIED
Traffic, Divorce & Family Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI

Kathy has been practicing law since 1992, and is the founder of Kathy S. Williams P.L.L.C. Born to a military U.S. family in Okinawa, Japan, she grew ... (more)

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CONTACT

800-949-7630

Jonathan W. Stillo Lawyer

Jonathan W. Stillo

VERIFIED
Immigration, Visa, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic

Jonathan Stillo is a practicing lawyer in the state of North Carolina. He graduated from North Carolina Central School of Law with his J.D. in 2016. H... (more)

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800-970-9551

Wiley  Nickel Lawyer

Wiley Nickel

VERIFIED
Criminal, Misdemeanor, DUI-DWI, Family Law, Divorce
Call 800-985-2120 For A Free Consultation Today!

Wiley lives and works in Cary, North Carolina. In 1998, he graduated from Tulane University with a major in Political Science and a minor in History.... (more)

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800-985-2120

John

John "Randy" Randolph Griffin

VERIFIED
Criminal, Accident & Injury, Traffic, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
You have rights. We protect them.

The criminal defense attorneys at Frasier & Griffin, PLLC represent individuals and corporations in state and federal criminal trials and appeals thro... (more)

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919-391-6659

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Matthew Charles Faucette Lawyer

Matthew Charles Faucette

VERIFIED
Criminal, Felony, DUI-DWI, Misdemeanor

Faucette Law Firm attorneys have represented individuals charged with murder, death by motor vehicle, armed robbery, burglary, kidnapping, extortion, ... (more)

Ryan Short

Administrative Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kenneth J Duke

Workers' Compensation, Traffic, Personal Injury, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Kerstin Walker Sutton

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Michael R. Paduchowski

Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kimberly R. Wilson

DUI-DWI, Litigation, Medical Malpractice, Pharmaceutical Product
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

FEDERAL COURT

A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, fe... (more...)
A branch of the United States government with power derived directly from the U.S. Constitution. Federal courts decide cases involving the U.S. Constitution, federal law--for example, patents, federal taxes, labor law and federal crimes, such as robbing a federally chartered bank--and cases where the parties are from different states and are involved in a dispute for $75,000 or more.

FALSE IMPRISONMENT

Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent ... (more...)
Intentionally restraining another person without having the legal right to do so. It's not necessary that physical force be used; threats or a show of apparent authority are sufficient. False imprisonment is a misdemeanor and a tort (a civil wrong). If the perpetrator confines the victim for a substantial period of time (or moves him a significant distance) in order to commit a felony, the false imprisonment may become a kidnapping. People who are arrested and get the charges dropped, or are later acquitted, often think that they can sue the arresting officer for false imprisonment (also known as false arrest). These lawsuits rarely succeed: As long as the officer had probable cause to arrest the person, the officer will not be liable for a false arrest, even if it turns out later that the information the officer relied upon was incorrect.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

INFORMED CONSENT

An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available al... (more...)
An agreement to do something or to allow something to happen, made with complete knowledge of all relevant facts, such as the risks involved or any available alternatives. For example, a patient may give informed consent to medical treatment only after the healthcare professional has disclosed all possible risks involved in accepting or rejecting the treatment. A healthcare provider or facility may be held responsible for an injury caused by an undisclosed risk. In another context, a person accused of committing a crime cannot give up his constitutional rights--for example, to remain silent or to talk with an attorney--unless and until he has been informed of those rights, usually via the well-known Miranda warnings.

ACQUITTAL

A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusio... (more...)
A decision by a judge or jury that a defendant in a criminal case is not guilty of a crime. An acquittal is not a finding of innocence; it is simply a conclusion that the prosecution has not proved its case beyond a reasonable doubt.

BOOKING

A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed beh... (more...)
A quaint phrase that refers to the recording of an arrested person's name, age, address and reason for arrest when that person is brought to jail and placed behind bars. Nowadays, the book is likely to be a computer. Usually, a mug shot and fingerprints are taken, and the arrestee's clothing and personal effects are inventoried and stored.

FELONY

A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases... (more...)
A serious crime (contrasted with misdemeanors and infractions, less serious crimes), usually punishable by a prison term of more than one year or, in some cases, by death. For example, murder, extortion and kidnapping are felonies; a minor fist fight is usually charged as a misdemeanor, and a speeding ticket is generally an infraction.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVIDENCE

Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or j... (more...)
Evidence that proves a fact by means of an inference. For example, from the evidence that a person was seen running away from the scene of a crime, a judge or jury may infer that the person committed the crime.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Maready

... That record reflected a total of six previous driving while impaired ("DWI") convictions. The Court of Appeals majority held it was not plain error to admit the entire driving record. 149 NCApp. ... Like the Goodman defendant, defendant here had six previous DWI convictions. ...

State v. Peele

... Defendant Lucian Jefferson Peele, Jr. appeals from his conviction for driving while impaired ("DWI"). ... The test recorded an alcohol concentration of.08, and defendant was issued a DWI citation. Defendant was found guilty of DWI in Martin County district court on 2 July 2007. ...

State v. Veazey

... On 1 January 2006, defendant Thomas Marland Veazey was charged with driving without a valid license and driving while impaired ("DWI") after being stopped at a driver's license checkpoint. Defendant was found guilty of DWI in district court and appealed to superior court. ...