Charlotte DUI-DWI Lawyer, North Carolina

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Charles Linwood Morgan, Jr. Lawyer

Charles Linwood Morgan, Jr.

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DUI-DWI, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor, White Collar Crime
focusing on criminal defense, from speeding tickets to murder and all things in between

Charles L. "Chuck" Morgan, Jr. has been representing the drinking driver and the criminally accused for over 30 years. Although his practice is based ... (more)

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Jason H. Reece Lawyer

Jason H. Reece

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Felony, Misdemeanor, Traffic

Lawyer.com Member Questionnaire Please describe a case(s) in the last year or two where you made a big difference. I make a difference by helpin... (more)

George E Gibbs Lawyer

George E Gibbs

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Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic, Landlord-Tenant
I am a Matthews, North Carolina attorney handling casesin Charlotte and surrounding areas.

George E Gibbs Jr. is a North Carolina Licensed Attorney serving Defendants in Mecklenburg, Gaston, Union and surrounding North Carolina Counties. Geo... (more)

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800-319-3560

Kirk Robert Lundell Lawyer

Kirk Robert Lundell

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Divorce & Family Law, Child Custody, Employment, Criminal, DUI-DWI

Following a successful 15-year career managing several well-known retail stores throughout the country, Mr. Lundell decided to refocus his passion for... (more)

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Sheena West Gatehouse

Administrative Law, Aviation Accident, Criminal, DUI-DWI
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Kevin L. Barnett

Traffic, DUI-DWI, Criminal
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Robert J Decurtins

DUI-DWI, Traffic, Criminal, White Collar Crime
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Christopher A. Connelly

Family Law, Traffic, White Collar Crime, DUI-DWI
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Chris McCartan

Administrative Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Traffic
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Christian Paul Hoel

Child Support, Criminal, Farms, DUI-DWI
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LEGAL TERMS

GRAND JURY

In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the f... (more...)
In criminal cases, a group that decides whether there is enough evidence to justify an indictment (formal charges) and a trial. A grand jury indictment is the first step, after arrest, in any formal prosecution of a felony.

INFRACTION

A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, ho... (more...)
A minor violation of the law that is punishable only by a fine--for example, a traffic or parking ticket. Not all vehicle-related violations are infractions, however--refusing to identify oneself when involved in an accident is a misdemeanor in some states.

JURY

Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision,... (more...)
Criminal Law Traffic TicketshomeGLOSSARY jury A group of people selected to apply the law, as stated by the judge, to the facts of a case and render a decision, called the verdict. Traditionally, an American jury was made up of 12 people who had to arrive at a unanimous decision. But today, in many states, juries in civil cases may be composed of as few as six members and non-unanimous verdicts may be permitted. (Most states still require 12-person, unanimous verdicts for criminal trials.) Tracing its history back over 1,000 years, the jury system was brought to England by William the Conqueror in 1066. The philosophy behind the jury system is that--especially in a criminal case--an accused's guilt or innocence should be judged by a group of people from her community ('a jury of her peers'). Recently, some courts have been experimenting with increasing the traditionally rather passive role of the jury by encouraging jurors to take notes and ask questions.

NOLLE PROSEQUI

Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue... (more...)
Latin for 'we shall no longer prosecute.' At trial, this is an entry made on the record by a prosecutor in a criminal case stating that he will no longer pursue the matter. An entry of nolle prosequi may be made at any time after charges are brought and before a verdict is returned or a plea entered. Essentially, it is an admission on the part of the prosecution that some aspect of its case against the defendant has fallen apart. Most of the time, prosecutors need a judge's A1:C576 to 'nol-pros' a case. (See Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 48a.) Abbreviated 'nol. pros.' or 'nol-pros.'

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

PROSECUTE

When a local District Attorney, state Attorney General or federal United States Attorney brings a criminal case against a defendant.

SELF-DEFENSE

An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal... (more...)
An affirmative defense to a crime. Self-defense is the use of reasonable force to protect oneself from an aggressor. Self-defense shields a person from criminal liability for the harm inflicted on the aggressor. For example, a robbery victim who takes the robber's weapon and uses it against the robber during a struggle won't be liable for assault and battery since he can show that his action was reasonably necessary to protect himself from imminent harm.

DISCOVERY

A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witness... (more...)
A formal investigation -- governed by court rules -- that is conducted before trial. Discovery allows one party to question other parties, and sometimes witnesses. It also allows one party to force the others to produce requested documents or other physical evidence. The most common types of discovery are interrogatories, consisting of written questions the other party must answer under penalty of perjury, and depositions, which involve an in-person session at which one party to a lawsuit has the opportunity to ask oral questions of the other party or her witnesses under oath while a written transcript is made by a court reporter. Other types of pretrial discovery consist of written requests to produce documents and requests for admissions, by which one party asks the other to admit or deny key facts in the case. One major purpose of discovery is to assess the strength or weakness of an opponent's case, with the idea of opening settlement talks. Another is to gather information to use at trial. Discovery is also present in criminal cases, in which by law the prosecutor must turn over to the defense any witness statements and any evidence that might tend to exonerate the defendant. Depending on the rules of the court, the defendant may also be obliged to share evidence with the prosecutor.

ACCOMPLICE

Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An ... (more...)
Someone who helps another person (known as the principal) commit a crime. Unlike an accessory, an accomplice is usually present when the crime is committed. An accomplice is guilty of the same offense and usually receives the same sentence as the principal. For instance, the driver of the getaway car for a burglary is an accomplice and will be guilty of the burglary even though he may not have entered the building.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Maready

... That record reflected a total of six previous driving while impaired ("DWI") convictions. The Court of Appeals majority held it was not plain error to admit the entire driving record. 149 NCApp. ... Like the Goodman defendant, defendant here had six previous DWI convictions. ...

State v. Peele

... Defendant Lucian Jefferson Peele, Jr. appeals from his conviction for driving while impaired ("DWI"). ... The test recorded an alcohol concentration of.08, and defendant was issued a DWI citation. Defendant was found guilty of DWI in Martin County district court on 2 July 2007. ...

State v. Veazey

... On 1 January 2006, defendant Thomas Marland Veazey was charged with driving without a valid license and driving while impaired ("DWI") after being stopped at a driver's license checkpoint. Defendant was found guilty of DWI in district court and appealed to superior court. ...