East Hartland Trusts Lawyer, Connecticut


Anthony B. Ludovico

Estate Administration, Trusts, Wills
Status:  In Good Standing           

Douglas K O Connell

Tax, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Gerald Raymond Nowotny

International Other, Immigration, Trusts, Insurance
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  26 Years

Donna D Vincenti

Immigration, Wills & Probate, Trusts, Estate Planning
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  36 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

David Thomas Ryan

Litigation, Trusts, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice
Status:  Inactive           

Caroline Demirs Calio

Foreclosure, Trusts, Criminal, Business Successions
Status:  In Good Standing           

Edward Thomas Falsey

Real Estate, Wills, Trusts, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  37 Years

Gregory James Spuches

Estate, Tax, Wills, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Robert B. Fried

Wills, Trusts, Family Law, Divorce
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  48 Years

Rachel S. Dranoff

Employee Rights, Elder Law, Estate Planning, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find East Hartland Trusts Lawyers and East Hartland Trusts Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Estate areas including Estate Planning, Wills & Probate and Power of Attorney attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

SPECIFIC BEQUEST

A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequ... (more...)
A specific item of property that is left to a named beneficiary under a will. If the person who made the will no longer owns the property when he dies, the bequest fails. In other words, the beneficiary cannot substitute a similar item in the estate. Example: If John leaves his 1954 Mercedes to Patti, and when John dies the 1954 Mercedes is long gone, Patti doesn't receive John's current car or the cash equivalent of the Mercedes. See ademption.

CONSERVATOR

Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of th... (more...)
Someone appointed by a judge to oversee the affairs of an incapacitated person. A conservator who manages financial affairs is often called a 'conservator of the estate.' One who takes care of personal matters, such as healthcare and living arrangements, is known as a 'conservator of the person.' Sometimes, one conservator is appointed to handle all these tasks. Depending on where you live, a conservator may also be called a guardian, committee or curator.

NET ESTATE

The value of all property owned at death less liabilities or debts.

STATUTORY SHARE

The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceas... (more...)
The portion of a deceased person's estate that a spouse is entitled to claim under state law. The statutory share is usually one-third or one-half of the deceased spouse's property, but in some states the exact amount of the spouse's share depends on whether or not the couple has young children and, in a few states, on how long the couple was married. In most states, if the deceased spouse left a will, the surviving spouse must choose either what the will provides or the statutory share. Sometimes the statutory share is known by its more arcane legal name, dower and curtesy, or as a forced or elective share.

TRUST CORPUS

Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, t... (more...)
Latin for 'the body' of the trust. This term refers to all the property transferred to a trust. For example, if a trust is established (funded) with $250,000, that money is the corpus. Sometimes the trust corpus is known as the 'res,' a Latin word meaning 'thing.'

TRUST DEED

The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to... (more...)
The most common method of financing real estate purchases in California (most other states use mortgages). The trust deed transfers the title to the property to a trustee -- often a title company -- who holds it as security for a loan. When the loan is paid off, the title is transferred to the borrower. The trustee will not become involved in the arrangement unless the borrower defaults on the loan. At that point, the trustee can sell the property and pay the lender from the proceeds.

ACCUMULATION TRUST

A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nic... (more...)
A trust in which the income is retained and not paid out to beneficiaries until certain conditions are met. For example, if Uncle Pierre creates a trust for Nick's benefit but stipulates that Nick will not get a penny until he gets a Ph.D. in French; Nick is the beneficiary of an accumulation trust.

PER CAPITA

Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leavin... (more...)
Under a will, the most common method of determining what share of property each beneficiary gets when one of the beneficiaries dies before the willmaker, leaving children of his or her own. For example, Fred leaves his house jointly to his son Alan and his daughter Julie. But Alan dies before Fred, leaving two young children. If Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per capita, Julie and the two grandchildren will each take a third. If, on the other hand, Fred's will states that heirs of a deceased beneficiary are to receive the property per stirpes, Julie will receive one-half of the property, and Alan's two children will share his half in equal shares (through Alan by right of representation).

ADMINISTRATION (OF AN ESTATE)

The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. I... (more...)
The court-supervised distribution of the probate estate of a deceased person. If there is a will that names an executor, that person manages the distribution. If not, the court appoints someone, who is generally known as the administrator. In some states, the person is called the 'personal representative' in either instance.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Taylor v. BARBERINO

... The plaintiffs, Marsha B. Taylor, formerly known as Marsha B. Petruzelli, and the accounting firm of Draskinis & Reims, PC, trustee of the Marsha B. Petruzelli Accumulation Trust and the Marsha B. Petruzelli Spray Trust (trusts), appeal from the summary judgment rendered by ...

Barber v. Barber

... At the hearing, the plaintiff disclosed that various partnership assets, including funds related to the sale of real property, had been transferred into two trusts in which he had a financial interest. Despite being directed by Kosowsky ...

Barber v. Barber

... At the hearing, the plaintiff disclosed that various partnership assets, including funds related to the sale of real property, had been transferred into two trusts in which he had a financial interest. Despite being directed by Kosowsky ...