East Haven DUI-DWI Lawyer, Connecticut

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Scott  Leventhal Lawyer

Scott Leventhal

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DUI-DWI, Accident & Injury, Criminal, Workers' Compensation

Representing the accused and the injured since 1957. We understand that sometimes good people make mistakes. The story of the LoRicco family and t... (more)

Kevin M. Smith

Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Criminal, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

Kevin Murray Smith

DUI-DWI, Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Felony, Misdemeanor
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  12 Years

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John J. Keefe

Family Law, Workers' Compensation, DUI-DWI, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  40 Years
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Paul V. Carty

Family Law, Divorce, DUI-DWI, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  34 Years

Diane Polan

Civil Rights, Criminal, DUI-DWI, Federal
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  39 Years

Robert Johnson Moore

Juvenile Law, Estate, Family Law, DUI-DWI
Status:  In Good Standing           

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Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

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By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

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LEGAL TERMS

PROSECUTOR

A lawyer who works for the local, state or federal government to bring and litigate criminal cases.

INTENTIONAL TORT

A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, ar... (more...)
A deliberate act that causes harm to another, for which the victim may sue the wrongdoer for damages. Acts of domestic violence, such as assault and battery, are intentional torts (as well as crimes).

BURGLARY

The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need no... (more...)
The crime of breaking into and entering a building with the intention to commit a felony. The breaking and entering need not be by force, and the felony need not be theft. For instance, someone would be guilty of burglary if he entered a house through an unlocked door in order to commit a murder.

CONTINGENCY FEE

A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obt... (more...)
A method of paying a lawyer for legal representation by which, instead of an hourly or per job fee, the lawyer receives a percentage of the money her client obtains after settling or winning the case. Often contingency fee agreements -- which are most commonly used in personal injury cases -- award the successful lawyer between 20% and 50% of the amount recovered. Lawyers representing defendants charged with crimes may not charge contingency fees. In most states, contingency fee agreements must be in writing.

ACTUS REUS

Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For ... (more...)
Latin for a 'guilty act.' The actus reus is the act which, in combination with a certain mental state, such as intent or recklessness, constitutes a crime. For example, the crime of theft requires physically taking something (the actus reus) coupled with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the object (the mental state, or mens rea).

NOLO CONTENDERE

A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committ... (more...)
A plea entered by the defendant in response to being charged with a crime. If a defendant pleads nolo contendere, she neither admits nor denies that she committed the crime, but agrees to a punishment (usually a fine or jail time) as if guilty. Usually, this type of plea is entered because it can't be used as an admission of guilt if a civil case is held after the criminal trial.

ARREST WARRANT

A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to ... (more...)
A document issued by a judge or magistrate that authorizes the police to arrest someone. Warrants are issued when law enforcement personnel present evidence to the judge or magistrate that convinces her that it is reasonably likely that a crime has taken place and that the person to be named in the warrant is criminally responsible for that crime.

LARCENY

Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the inten... (more...)
Another term for theft. Although the definition of this term differs from state to state, it typically means taking property belonging to another with the intent to permanently deprive the owner of the property. If the taking is non forceful, it is larceny; if it is accompanied by force or fear directed against a person, it is robbery, a much more serious offense.

IMPEACH

(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he h... (more...)
(1) To discredit. To impeach a witness' credibility, for example, is to show that the witness is not believable. A witness may be impeached by showing that he has made statements that are inconsistent with his present testimony, or that he has a reputation for not being a truthful person. (2) The process of charging a public official, such as the President or a federal judge, with a crime or misconduct and removing the official from office.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

State v. Fontaine

... 919, 883 A.2d 1246 (2005). [4] During his examination by the state, Abely testified that when Roberts asked the defendant for his operator's license, the defendant replied, "[y]ou don't need a license to operate a moped . . . give me a break, I just got out on a DWI offense . . . ...

State v. Fontaine

... 919, 883 A.2d 1246 (2005). [4] During his examination by the state, Abely testified that when Roberts asked the defendant for his operator's license, the defendant replied, "[y]ou don't need a license to operate a moped ... give me a break, I just got out on a DWI offense ... ...