Fort Collins Adoption Lawyer, Colorado


Kara Elizabeth Clark Lawyer

Kara Elizabeth Clark

Divorce & Family Law, Adoption, Child Custody, Estate, Wills & Probate

Kathryn Sjulin Lonowski

Divorce, Child Support, Adoption, Car Accident
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

Robert J. Penny

Divorce, Adoption, Corporate, Contract
Status:  In Good Standing           

Leah Bishop

Adoption, Bankruptcy, Child Support, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT
Speak with Lawyer.com

Laurie R. Stirman

Estate Planning, Adoption, Bankruptcy, Litigation
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amie Lopez

Adoption, Constitutional Law, Divorce, Elder Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  17 Years

Leah Rae Bishop

Real Estate, Family Law, Adoption, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

Nicole Jacqueline Liley

Adoption, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-620-0900

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-620-0900

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided is not privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Fort Collins Adoption Lawyers and Fort Collins Adoption Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Child Custody, Child Support, Divorce and Family Law attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

FAULT DIVORCE

A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorc... (more...)
A tradition that required one spouse to prove that the other spouse was legally at fault, to obtain a divorce. The 'innocent' spouse was then granted the divorce from the 'guilty' spouse. Today, 35 states still allow a spouse to allege fault in obtaining a divorce. The traditional fault grounds for divorce are adultery, cruelty, desertion, confinement in prison, physical incapacity and incurable insanity. These grounds are also generally referred to as marital misconduct.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

FAMILY AND MEDICAL LEAVE ACT (FMLA)

A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family hea... (more...)
A federal law that requires employers to provide an employee with 12 weeks of unpaid leave during a year's time for the birth or adoption of a child, family health needs or personal illness. The employer must allow the employee to return to the same position or a position similar to that held before taking the leave. There are exceptions to the FMLA: the most notable is that only employers with 50 or more employees are covered--about half the workforce.

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

HEAD OF HOUSEHOLD

A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income ta... (more...)
A person who supports and maintains, in one household, one or more people who are closely related to him by blood, marriage or adoption. Under federal income tax law, you are eligible for favorable tax treatment as the head of household only if you are unmarried and you manage a household which is the principal residence (for more than half of the year) of dependent children or other dependent relatives. Under bankruptcy homestead and exemption laws, the terms householder and 'head of household' mean the same thing. Examples include a single woman supporting her disabled sister and her own children or a bachelor supporting his parents. Many states consider a single person supporting only himself to be a head of household as well.

CLOSE CORPORATION

A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporation... (more...)
A corporation owned and operated by a few individuals, often members of the same family, rather than by public shareholders. State laws permit close corporations to function more informally than regular corporations. For example, shareholders can make decisions without holding meetings of the board of directors, and can fill vacancies on the board without a vote of the shareholders.

SURVIVORS BENEFITS

An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disabil... (more...)
An amount of money available to the surviving spouse and minor or disabled children of a deceased worker who qualified for Social Security retirement or disability benefits.

NEXT FRIEND

A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children a... (more...)
A person, usually a relative, who appears in court on behalf of a minor or incompetent plaintiff, but who is not a party to the lawsuit. For example, children are often represented in court by their parents as 'next friends.'

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

In re CAO for Adoption of GMR

Father's paternity was established by his admission in March 1999, when he was ordered to pay monthly child support to LRL-O. (mother) and the parties stipulated 510 to unspecified parenting time. Father asserts that his child support obligation was later reduced. He was confined ...

In re Marriage of Dunkle

... disabilities ranging from moderate to severe. On behalf of these children, she receives a foster care payment of approximately $1200 per month and adoption subsidies of approximately $5000 per month. Father contends that the trial ...

In re Marriage of Rodrick

... to be a step toward husband and wife's adopting JS Their attorney wrote them a letter stating they could adopt JS "once [they] have had custody of him for one year." In January 2003, the attorney sent husband and wife a series of documents to effect the adoption, including one ...