Greenville Divorce & Family Law Lawyer, South Carolina


James Stone Craven Lawyer

James Stone Craven

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute, Intellectual Property, Business

James Craven proudly serves Greenville, South Carolina and the neighboring communities in the areas of criminal defense, divorce & family, lawsuit & d... (more)

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800-838-4280

Lloyd Wayne Patterson Lawyer

Lloyd Wayne Patterson

VERIFIED
Divorce & Family Law, Wills & Probate, Estate, Car Accident, Traffic

I have over forty five years of business and legal experience. Prior to entering law, I owned and managed corporations involved in various fields of t... (more)

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CONTACT

800-779-0940

W. Chris Castro Lawyer

W. Chris Castro

VERIFIED
Criminal, Business, Divorce & Family Law, Lawsuit & Dispute
Fighting for Your Rights.

Attorney W. Chris Castro is a solo practitioner and the founder of the Castro Law Firm, LLC located in Greenville, South Carolina. His practice prima... (more)

Andrew M. Jones Lawyer

Andrew M. Jones

VERIFIED
Divorce, Real Estate, Landlord-Tenant, Accident & Injury, Estate

Andrew M. Jones, III is a practicing lawyer in the state of South Carolina. Attorney Jones received his J.D. from the University of South Carolina Sch... (more)

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Robert H. Cooper Lawyer

Robert H. Cooper

VERIFIED
Employment, Accident & Injury, Bankruptcy, Consumer Protection, Divorce & Family Law

Robert H. Cooper, Esquire, is the owner of The Cooper Law Firm and has practiced bankruptcy law almost exclusively since 1990. Mr. Cooper practices i... (more)

David Arthur Braghirol Lawyer

David Arthur Braghirol

VERIFIED
Criminal, Divorce & Family Law, Traffic, DUI-DWI

David Braghirol is a practicing attorney in the state of South Carolina. He graduated from University of South Carolina with his J.D. in 1997. He curr... (more)

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CONTACT

800-296-8980

Jamie DeMint

Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury, Medical Malpractice
Status:  In Good Standing           

Jefferson G. Wood

Criminal, Family Law, Insurance, Personal Injury, Products Liability
Status:  In Good Standing           

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W Marsh Robertson

Adoption, Alimony & Spousal Support, Child Support, Children's Rights
Status:  In Good Standing           

Thomas T. Hodges

Divorce & Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

NO-FAULT DIVORCE

Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along... (more...)
Any divorce in which the spouse who wants to split up does not have to accuse the other of wrongdoing, but can simply state that the couple no longer gets along. Until no-fault divorce arrived in the 1970s, the only way a person could get a divorce was to prove that the other spouse was at fault for the marriage not working. No-fault divorces are usually granted for reasons such as incompatibility, irreconcilable differences, or irretrievable or irremediable breakdown of the marriage. Also, some states allow incurable insanity as a basis for a no-fault divorce. Compare fault divorce.

CONDONATION

One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and la... (more...)
One person's approval of another's activities, constituting a defense to a fault divorce. For example, if a wife did not object to her husband's adultery and later tries to use it as grounds for a divorce, he could argue that she had condoned his behavior and could perhaps prevent her from divorcing him on these grounds.

ALIMONY

The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of lo... (more...)
The money paid by one ex-spouse to the other for support under the terms of a court order or settlement agreement following a divorce. Except in marriages of long duration (ten years or more) or in the case of an ailing spouse, alimony usually lasts for a set period, with the expectation that the recipient spouse will become self-supporting. Alimony is also called 'spousal support' or 'maintenance.'

INCURABLE INSANITY

A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of... (more...)
A legal reason for obtaining either a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce. It is rarely used, however, because of the difficulty of proving both the insanity of the spouse being divorced and that the insanity is incurable.

PETITION (IMMIGRATION)

A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, su... (more...)
A formal request for a green card or a specific nonimmigrant (temporary) visa. In many cases, the petition must be filed by someone sponsoring the immigrant, such as a family member or employer. After the petition is approved, the immigrant may submit the actual visa or green card application.

SEPARATE PROPERTY

In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's... (more...)
In community property states, property owned and controlled entirely by one spouse in a marriage. At divorce, separate property is not divided under the state's property division laws, but is kept by the spouse who owns it. Separate property includes all property that a spouse obtained before marriage, through inheritance or as a gift. It also includes any property that is traceable to separate property -- for example, cash from the sale of a vintage car owned by one spouse before marriage-and any property that the spouses agree is separate property. Compare community property and equitable distribution.

WRONGFUL DEATH RECOVERIES

After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is i... (more...)
After a wrongful death lawsuit, the portion of a judgment intended to compensate a plaintiff for having to live without a deceased person. The compensation is intended to cover the earnings and the emotional comfort and support the deceased person would have provided.

EMANCIPATION

The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order... (more...)
The act of freeing someone from restraint or bondage. For example, on January 1, 1863, slaves in the confederate states were declared free by an executive order of President Lincoln, known as the 'Emancipation Proclamation.' After the Civil War, this emancipation was extended to the entire country and made law by the ratification of the thirteenth amendment to the Constitution. Nowadays, emancipation refers to the point at which a child is free from parental control. It occurs when the child's parents no longer perform their parental duties and surrender their rights to the care, custody and earnings of their minor child. Emancipation may be the result of a voluntary agreement between the parents and child, or it may be implied from their acts and ongoing conduct. For example, a child who leaves her parents' home and becomes entirely self-supporting without their objection is considered emancipated, while a child who goes to stay with a friend or relative and gets a part-time job is not. Emancipation may also occur when a minor child marries or enters the military.