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Greenville Family Law Lawyer, North Carolina


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Mark A. Ward

Family Law, Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Workers' Compensation
Status:  In Good Standing           

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W. Lee Allen

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

David C. Sutton

Family Law, Bad Faith Insurance, Civil Rights, Constitutional Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Edwin M. Sandy Hardy

Family Law, Traffic, Divorce, Bankruptcy
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Jon G. Nuckolls

Criminal, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy Ann Edwards

Child Custody, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ernest L. Conner

Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Family Law, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Christina Maria Sheppard

Workers' Compensation, Election & Political, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Peggy T. Smith

Divorce, Medical Malpractice, Family Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect
Status:  In Good Standing           

Edwin M. Hardy

Credit & Debt, Family Law, Federal Appellate Practice, Criminal
Status:  In Good Standing           

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LEGAL TERMS

PROVOCATION

The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going t... (more...)
The act of inciting another person to do a particular thing. In a fault divorce, provocation may constitute a defense to the divorce, preventing it from going through. For example, if a wife suing for divorce claims that her husband abandoned her, the husband might defend the suit on the grounds that she provoked the abandonment by driving him out of the house.

FOREIGN DIVORCE

A divorce obtained in a different state or country from the place where one spouse resides at the time of the divorce. As a general rule, foreign divorces are r... (more...)
A divorce obtained in a different state or country from the place where one spouse resides at the time of the divorce. As a general rule, foreign divorces are recognized as valid if the spouse requesting the divorce became a resident of the state or country granting the divorce, and if both parties consented to the jurisdiction of the foreign court. A foreign divorce obtained by one person without the consent of the other is normally not valid, unless the nonconsenting spouse later acts as if the foreign divorce were valid, for example, by remarrying.

GROUNDS FOR DIVORCE

Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or ... (more...)
Legal reasons for requesting a divorce. All states require a spouse who files for divorce to state the grounds, court and whether requesting a fault divorce or a no-fault divorce.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

NEXT OF KIN

The closest relatives, as defined by state law, of a deceased person. Most states recognize the spouse and the nearest blood relatives as next of kin.

SICK LEAVE

Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, howe... (more...)
Time off work for illness. Most employers provide for some paid sick leave, although no law requires them to do so. Under the Family and Medical Leave Act, however, a worker is guaranteed up to 12 weeks per year of unpaid leave for severe or lasting illnesses.

CENSUS

An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires ... (more...)
An official count of the number of people living in a certain area, such as a district, city, county, state, or nation. The United States Constitution requires the federal government to perform a national census every ten years. The census includes information about the respondents' sex, age, family, and social and economic status.

DIVORCE AGREEMENT

An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must... (more...)
An agreement made by a divorcing couple regarding the division of property, custody and visitation of the children, alimony or child support. The agreement must be put in writing, signed by the parties and accepted by the court. It becomes part of the divorce decree and does away with the necessity of having a trial on the issues covered by the agreement. A divorce agreement may also be called a marital settlement agreement, marital termination agreement or settlement agreement.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Mason v. Dwinnell

... Thus, the trial court properly concluded in its 1 June 2006 order that Mason "has standing to pursue custody of the minor child." See also 3 Suzanne Reynolds, Lee's North Carolina Family Law § 13.4.c.ii, at 13-21 (5th ed. 2002) ("The plain language of the North Carolina statute ...

Craddock v. Craddock

... (Emphasis supplied). The legislative policy and goals of this statute was articulated in Lee's North Carolina Family Law treatise: The ... 2 Suzanne Reynolds, Lee's North Carolina Family Law § 9.85, at 493-94 (5th ed.1999). In ...

Hall v. Hall

... No. COA07-624. Court of Appeals of North Carolina. February 5, 2008. Wake Family Law Group, by Julianne Booth Rothert and Marc W. Sokol, Raleigh, for plaintiff-appellee. Kristoff Law Offices, PA, by Sharon H. Kristoff, Clayton, for defendant-appellant. HUNTER, Judge. ...