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Greenville Family Law Lawyer, North Carolina


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Mark A. Ward

Family Law, Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Workers' Compensation, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           

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W. Lee Allen

Bankruptcy, Divorce, Family Law
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David C. Sutton

Family Law, Bad Faith Insurance, Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Premises Liability
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Edwin M. Sandy Hardy

Family Law, Traffic, Divorce, Bankruptcy, Farms
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Jon G. Nuckolls

Criminal, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Amy Ann Edwards

Child Custody, Criminal, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Ernest L. Conner

Civil & Human Rights, Criminal, Family Law, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  31 Years

Matthew C. Geoffrion

Criminal, Family Law, Personal Injury, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

Phillip R. Dixon

Criminal, Family Law, Juvenile Law, Traffic
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  44 Years

Christina Maria Sheppard

Workers' Compensation, Election & Political, Family Law, Trusts
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  13 Years

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LEGAL TERMS

COMMON LAW MARRIAGE

In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a marrie... (more...)
In some states, a type of marriage in which couples can become legally married by living together for a long period of time, representing themselves as a married couple and intending to be married. Contrary to popular belief, the couple must intend to be married and act as though they are for a common law marriage to take effect -- merely living together for a long time won't do it.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

POT TRUST

A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One impor... (more...)
A trust for children in which the trustee decides how to spend money on each child, taking money out of the trust to meet each child's specific needs. One important advantage of a pot trust over separate trusts is that it allows the trustee to provide for one child's unforeseen need, such as a medical emergency. But a pot trust can also make the trustee's life difficult by requiring choices about disbursing funds to the various children. A pot trust ends when the youngest child reaches a certain age, usually 18 or 21.

IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES

Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable... (more...)
Differences between spouses that are considered sufficiently severe to make married life together more or less impossible. In a number of states, irreconcilable differences is the accepted ground for a no-fault divorce. As a practical matter, courts seldom, if ever, inquire into what the differences actually are, and routinely grant a divorce as long as the party seeking the divorce says the couple has irreconcilable differences. Compare incompatibility; irremediable breakdown.

INJUNCTION

A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy fo... (more...)
A court decision that is intended to prevent harm--often irreparable harm--as distinguished from most court decisions, which are designed to provide a remedy for harm that has already occurred. Injunctions are orders that one side refrain from or stop certain actions, such as an order that an abusive spouse stay away from the other spouse or that a logging company not cut down first-growth trees. Injunctions can be temporary, pending a consideration of the issue later at trial (these are called interlocutory decrees or preliminary injunctions). Judges can also issue permanent injunctions at the end of trials, in which a party may be permanently prohibited from engaging in some conduct--for example, infringing a copyright or trademark or making use of illegally obtained trade secrets. Although most injunctions order a party not to do something, occasionally a court will issue a 'mandatory injunction' to order a party to carry out a positive act--for example, return stolen computer code.

GUARDIAN

An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a '... (more...)
An adult who has been given the legal right by a court to control and care for a minor or her property. Someone who looks after a child's property is called a 'guardian of the estate.' An adult who has legal authority to make personal decisions for the child, including responsibility for his physical, medical and educational needs, is called a 'guardian of the person.' Sometimes just one person will be named to take care of all these tasks. An individual appointed by a court to look after an incapacitated adult may also be known as a guardian, but is more frequently called a conservator.

DISSOLUTION

A term used instead of divorce in some states.

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Mason v. Dwinnell

... Thus, the trial court properly concluded in its 1 June 2006 order that Mason "has standing to pursue custody of the minor child." See also 3 Suzanne Reynolds, Lee's North Carolina Family Law § 13.4.c.ii, at 13-21 (5th ed. 2002) ("The plain language of the North Carolina statute ...

Craddock v. Craddock

... (Emphasis supplied). The legislative policy and goals of this statute was articulated in Lee's North Carolina Family Law treatise: The ... 2 Suzanne Reynolds, Lee's North Carolina Family Law § 9.85, at 493-94 (5th ed.1999). In ...

Hall v. Hall

... No. COA07-624. Court of Appeals of North Carolina. February 5, 2008. Wake Family Law Group, by Julianne Booth Rothert and Marc W. Sokol, Raleigh, for plaintiff-appellee. Kristoff Law Offices, PA, by Sharon H. Kristoff, Clayton, for defendant-appellant. HUNTER, Judge. ...