Hattiesburg Family Law Lawyer, Mississippi


Includes: Collaborative Law, Domestic Violence & Neglect, Paternity, Prenuptial Agreements

Jay Rodgers

Family Law, Eminent Domain, Banking & Finance, Wills & Probate
Status:  In Good Standing           

Wayne Hynum

Accident & Injury, Personal Injury, Divorce & Family Law, Family Law

FREE CONSULTATION 

CONTACT

John Knox

Contract, Personal Injury, Civil Rights, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Margaret Mary Ciraldo

Family Law, Divorce & Family Law
Status:  Inactive           Licensed:  29 Years
Speak with Lawyer.com

Elizabeth Porter Todd

Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           

Edwin L Pittman

Domestic Violence & Neglect, Criminal, Collection, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

S Christopher Farris

Workers' Compensation, Family Law, Criminal, Personal Injury
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  32 Years

Kimberly Marie Bates Johnson

International Other, Health Care Other, Family Law, Administrative Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  22 Years

George Holomon Gunter

Commercial Real Estate, Divorce, Family Law
Status:  In Good Standing           Licensed:  42 Years

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.


Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

Member Representative

Call me for fastest results!
800-943-8690

Free Help: Use This Form or Call 800-943-8690

By submitting this lawyer request, I confirm I have read and agree to the Consent to Receive Email, Phone, Text Messages, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy. Information provided may not be privileged or confidential.

TIPS

Easily find Hattiesburg Family Law Lawyers and Hattiesburg Family Law Firms. For more attorneys, search all Divorce & Family Law areas including Adoption, Child Custody, Child Support and Divorce attorneys.

LEGAL TERMS

OPEN ADOPTION

An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most ... (more...)
An adoption in which there is some degree of contact between the birthparents and the adoptive parents and sometimes with the child as well. As opposed to most adoptions in which birth and adoption records are sealed by court order, open adoptions allow the parties to decide how much contact the adoptive family and the birthparents will have.

ABANDONMENT (OF A CHILD)

A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the ch... (more...)
A parent's failure to provide any financial assistance to or communicate with his or her child over a period of time. When this happens, a court may deem the child abandoned by that parent and order that person's parental rights terminated. Abandonment also describes situations in which a child is physically abandoned -- for example, left on a doorstep, delivered to a hospital or put in a trash can. Physically abandoned children are usually placed in orphanages and made available for adoption.

GUARDIANSHIP

A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty... (more...)
A legal relationship created by a court between a guardian and his ward--either a minor child or an incapacitated adult. The guardian has a legal right and duty to care for the ward. This may involve making personal decisions on his or her behalf, managing property or both. Guardianships of incapacitated adults are more typically called conservatorships .

CRUELTY

Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practi... (more...)
Any act of inflicting unnecessary emotional or physical pain. Cruelty or mental cruelty is the most frequently used fault ground for divorce because as a practical matter, courts will accept minor wrongs or disagreements as sufficient evidence of cruelty to justify the divorce.

STIRPES

A term used in wills that refers to descendants of a common ancestor or branch of a family.

ISSUE

A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called... (more...)
A term generally meaning all your children and their children down through the generations, including grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and so on. Also called 'lineal descendants.'

COLLUSION

Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds f... (more...)
Secret cooperation between two people in order to fool another. Collusion was often practiced by couples before no-fault divorce in order to make up a grounds for divorce (such as adultery). By fabricating a permitted reason for divorce, colluding couples hoped to trick a judge into granting their freedom from the marriage. But a spouse accused of wrongdoing who later changed his or her mind about the divorce could expose the collusion to prevent the divorce from going through.

ACCOMPANYING RELATIVE

An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card ca... (more...)
An immediate family member of someone who immigrates to the United States. In most cases, a person who is eligible to receive some type of visa or green card can also obtain green cards or similar visas for accompanying relatives. Accompanying relatives include spouses and unmarried children under the age of 21.

FITNESS

The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives i... (more...)
The ability of a prospective adoptive parent to provide for the best interests of a child. A court may consider many aspects of the prospective parents' lives in evaluating their fitness to adopt a child, including financial stability, marital stability, career obligations, other children, physical and mental health and criminal history.

SAMPLE LEGAL CASES

Lowrey v. Lowrey

... However, a few cases suggest 286 that the issue is a question of fact for the chancellor to decide...." Bell on Mississippi Family Law at § 6.02[3][b] n. 58 (citing Stone v. Stone, 824 So.2d 645, 647-48 (Miss.Ct.App.2002); Aron v. Aron, 832 So.2d 1257, 1258-59 (Miss.Ct.App.2002 ...

Wallace v. Wallace

... 19. While the chancellor has much discretion in deciding family-law matters, we find that the evidence in the present case overwhelmingly points to the conclusion that Donna and Terrance cohabited and mutually supported each other. ...

Chapman v. Ward

... 20. James cites Professor Deborah Bell's treatise, Bell on Mississippi Family Law, 338 (Nautilus Publishing Co.2006) as authority for the proposition that social security benefits paid to a child as a result of the payor's employment can offset child support arrearages. ...